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Aviation Sustainability and the Environment, CAPA 16-Jan-2020

Headlines

World Economic Forum: Global risk perceptions have shifted from the economy to the environment (WEF report)

Etihad Airways targets zero net carbon emissions by 2050

Lufthansa Group to increase fuel efficiency by 1.5% in 2020

Hi Fly targets carbon neutrality by end of 2021

Regional Jet OÜ to save paper as part of Paper free Cockpit project

Swedavia: it is 'absolutely essential' to develop infrastructure adapted to fossil-free aviation (Swedavia report)

Schiphol Group commits to implement nitrogen reduction measures on advice from Remkes Committee (Schiphol Group report)

VINCI commits to 40% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2030, carbon neutrality in 2050 (Vinci report)

Aéroports de la Côte d'Azur details net-zero emissions 2030 strategy (Aéroports de la Côte d'Azur report)

Dortmund Airport website now CO2 neutral (Dortmund Airport report)

Tourism New Zealand: 93% of New Zealanders agree international tourism is good (TNZ report)

UK Health secretary Matt Hancock: 'We shouldn't be flying less' (BBC news report)

Aviation Environment Federation: 'No justification for cutting APD to save Flybe'

World Economic Forum: Global risk perceptions have shifted from the economy to the environment

16-Jan-2020 10:01

World Economic Forum (WEF) released (15-Jan-2020) its Global Risks Report, reporting all five of the top risks by likelihood, and three by impact are climate-related. The WEF noted that the global risk landscape "seems to be changing faster than our ability to manage it" and there has been a "drastic and relatively quick shift in risk perceptions" from economic to environmental. WEF stated there are four trends that explain why risk perceptions have shifted so drastically:

  • Climate change is a priority for youth, with 90% of younger community leader respondents believing that "extreme heat", "destruction of ecosystems" and "health impacted by pollution" will worsen in 2020. They also rate the impact of these events as extreme and imminent;
  • Exposure to better information, with the release of more accurate climate-change data in recent years;
  • Direct contact with climate change, with extreme weather events having hit every continent and the frequency of natural disasters increasing to one per week. As a result, more people are feeling the impacts of climate change, many of whom are in regions of the world that were previously unaffected;
  • Internalisation of economic stagnation, as years of overcoming economic hardship may have led respondents to believe that economic risks can be weathered in a way that climate change cannot.Moreover, newer generations may no longer see a precarious economy as a risk, but simply as a reality.

WEF stated that in the near future, immediate economic and political concerns could arise, but they should not fully displace ongoing environmental risks from our perceptions.

Original report: 15 years of risk: from economic collapse to planetary devastation

15 years of risk: from economic collapse to planetary devastation

  • Risk perception has shifted from the economy to the climate.
  • Greater knowledge and experience of climate change prompted the shift.
  • Short-termism could create blind spots and limit integrated efforts to mitigate risks.

The global risk landscape seems to be changing faster than our ability to manage it.

When the World Economic Forum first launched the Global Risks Perception Survey (GRPS) in 2006, economic risks filled most of the top spots by likelihood and impact.

Fifteen years and a Great Recession later, the world economy is again facing serious obstacles – inequality, protectionism and slowdown – yet economic risks have moved away from the survey’s spotlight.

In this year’s Global Risks Report – the 15th edition – all five of the top risks by likelihood, and three by impact are climate-related. Never before has one issue dominated the survey in this way, not even through the 2008 – 2009 financial crisis, when economic concerns occupied at most three out of the five top spots by likelihood, and four by impact.

What can explain this marked shift in risk perception – from economic to climate – even though many economic risks remain?

Examining the shift in risk perceptions

Four trends can explain why risk perceptions have shifted so drastically:

1) Climate change is a priority for youth

The world’s young people are tremendously concerned about the fate of the planet. Ninety percent of respondents to the GRPS from the Forum’s Global Shapers Community – younger community leaders – believe that “extreme heat”, “destruction of ecosystems” and “health impacted by pollution” will worsen in 2020. They also rate the impact of these events as extreme and imminent.

Young people have made their voices heard across the world, not only using social media, but using their feet and their ballot papers. Last year, millions of schoolchildren participated in climate strikes worldwide, young Europeans were decisive in the Greens’ parliamentary election success, and recent polling suggests environmental policy will be pivotal for young Americans in the 2020 elections. This generation’s activism has likely influenced global risk perceptions.

2) Exposure to better information

More accurate climate-change data has been released in recent years. The IPBES Global Assessment Report on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services, a landmark assessment of the state of the planet, was released in May 2019. Similarly, the Met Office Hadley Centre’s HadSST4 dataset, the most widely used source of sea surface temperature data, was updated just last year to show that oceans have warmed more than previously estimated. Both warned of a much more dire future for the planet – and a shorter timeframe to avert it.

3) Direct contact with climate change

Extreme weather events have hit every continent and the frequency of natural disasters has increased to one per week. Over the past few years, Belgium, France, Germany, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and the United Kingdom have seen record-breaking heatwaves; fierce wildfires have blazed through Australia, Canada, Chile, Spain and the US; while Bangladesh, India, Thailand and Sri Lanka have registered severe and longer droughts. As a result, more people are feeling the impacts of climate change, many of whom are in regions of the world that were previously unaffected.

4) Internalization of economic stagnation

Years of overcoming economic hardship may have led respondents to believe that economic risks can be weathered in a way that climate change cannot. After all, the 2010s were the slowest post-crisis period in terms of growth since the 1970s – the world economy has been stuck at approximately 3% growth since the Great Recession.

Moreover, newer generations may no longer see a precarious economy as a risk, but simply as a reality. For example, Americans born between 1980 and 1989 are 34% less well off than earlier generations, 67% of young Latin Americans have experienced financial instability, and those in their 30s in the United Kingdom are “the first post-war cohort not to at least start working-age life with higher incomes than their predecessors”.

The environmental wager

It is no doubt welcome news that stakeholders are worried about the fate of the planet. It means there is increased awareness of the grave threats of environmental degradation; which hopefully will translate into more ambitious climate action.

However, the drastic and relatively quick shift in risk perceptions – from economic to environmental in the GRPS – is potentially troubling. Because environmental and economic risks are inextricably linked, risk perceptions that account for only one over the other mean blind spots may be arising and integrated mitigation efforts may be lacking.

The stable – albeit sluggish – economy of the past decade has incentivized the development of green practices, but years of progress could be offset by a tougher economic context. The global economy is showing signs of a slowdown that could last for many years, and if stakeholders view economic and environmental risks as distinct, there is a higher likelihood that short-termism will take hold as creating opportunities for economic advancement becomes more pressing.

In the near future, immediate economic and political concerns could arise, but they should not fully displace ongoing environmental risks from our perceptions.

Etihad Airways targets zero net carbon emissions by 2050

Etihad Airways committed (15-Jan-2020) to a minimum target of zero net carbon emissions by 2050 and to halve its 2019 net emission levels by 2035. The company's environmental targets will be achieved through a mix of internal initiatives, collaboration with industry partners and the adoption of a comprehensive programme of relevant carbon offsets, to be developed with specific focus on the requirements of the UAEand markets served by the airline.

Etihad Airways Group CEO Tony Douglas said the "global focus on the environment and the urgency of reducing carbon emissions has never been greater" and the airline is "taking an active role in reducing the impact of aviation on the environment through initiatives ranging from optimised fuel management to sustainable financing practices".

Original report: Etihad targets zero net carbon emissions by 2050, in expanded commitment to environmental sustainabi

Etihad Airways, the national airline of the United Arab Emirates, today committed to a minimum target of zero net carbon emissions by 2050 and halving of its 2019 net emission levels by 2035.

The company’s ambitious environmental targets will be achieved through a mix of internal initiatives, collaboration with industry partners and adoption of a comprehensive program of relevant carbon offsets, to be developed with specific focus on the requirements of the UAE and markets served by the airline.

The Group Chief Executive Officer of Etihad Aviation Group, Tony Douglas, said: “The global focus on the environment and the urgency of reducing carbon emissions has never been greater. Etihad Aviation Group, together with its partners, is taking an active role in reducing the impact of aviation on the environment through initiatives ranging from optimised fuel management to sustainable financing practices.”  

Today’s announcement came as part of Abu Dhabi Sustainability Week, an annual event in the capital of the UAE, where Etihad is headquartered. 

Mr Douglas said the entire air transport industry, from airlines and suppliers to airspace providers, was responsible for helping to reduce aviation’s emissions, and solutions needed to be holistic and coordinated, not isolated and sporadic.

“Airlines have attracted significant scrutiny in the global discussion of the environment, and our collective challenge as a fast-growing industry is to deliver meaningful initiatives which can quickly help to contain and reduce carbon emissions,” he said. 

The International Air Transport Association (IATA) predicts that the number of passenger journeys will more than double within 20 years, from 4.5 billion in 2019 to an estimated 9 billion by the late 2030s.

The International Transport Forum (ITF) at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) adds that international aviation will experience compound annual growth of 3.8 per cent to 2050, forecasting that traffic will reach 16.5 billion passenger kilometres, or 3.6 times 2015 volumes. 

Recent sustainability initiatives taken by Etihad Aviation Group include:

  • Continued induction of the latest-generation, most fuel-efficient aircraft, including additional Boeing 787 Dreamliners, and plans for three new types – the wide-bodied Airbus A350-1000 and Boeing 777-9, and narrow-bodied Airbus A321neo. The next Dreamliner is due to arrive next week; 
  • Commencement of the Etihad Greenliner Programme, in which the airline’s entire fleet of Boeing 787 aircraft will be used during normal scheduled flights as ‘test beds’ for sustainable products and practices;
  • Becoming the first airline to secure commercial funding conditional upon compliance with the Sustainable Development Goals of the United Nations. In partnership with First Abu Dhabi Bank and Abu Dhabi Global Markets, Etihad recently secured 150 million Euros to help finance the development of a multi-storey ‘eco residence’ for cabin crew living in Abu Dhabi. The airline is now exploring more opportunities for this style of funding;
  • Commitment to reduce single use plastics by 80 per cent by 2022, and;   
  • Partnering in the development of sustainable aviation fuels including biofuel developed and refined in Abu Dhabi from saltwater-tolerant plants, and commitment to support the development of another sustainable jet fuel from municipal waste in Abu Dhabi.

Lufthansa Group to increase fuel efficiency by 1.5% in 2020

Lufthansa Group senior director sales Gulf, Afghanistan and Pakistan Heinrich Lange said the group's responsibility for being at the "forefront of sustainable development" in aviation is "growing" (Al Bawaba, 15-Jan-2020).

He added: "2020 represents a major juncture in our journey to sustainability as we aim to increase fuel efficiency by 1.5% this year... We remain committed to exploring new avenues to bring our aviation sustainability drive to all our markets including the Middle East".

Hi Fly targets carbon neutrality by end of 2021

Hi Fly CEO Paulo Mirpuri said the carrier plans to achieve carbon neutrality by the end of 2021 (Simple Flying, 15-Jan-2020). Mr Mirpuri added the target will be achieved by operating more efficient aircraft, investing in new technology and developing an ocean based emissions offset programme.

Mr Mirpuri said the new technology is expected to reduce carbon emissions by 10% for each aircraft.

Regional Jet OÜ to save paper as part of Paper free Cockpit project

Regional Jet OÜ, via its official LinkedIn account, announced (15-Jan-2020) plans to save two tonnes of paper or an equivalent to 50 trees in 2020, as part of its Paper free Cockpit project. Marketing and communications director Toomas Uibo said: "Aviation Industry is responsible for 2% to 3% of all the world's CO2 emissions, and any company with a sense of social responsibility should be doing everything it can to make its ecological footprint as small as possible".

VINCI commits to 40% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2030, carbon neutrality in 2050

VINCI Group committed (15-Jan-2020) all its business divisions to achieve a 40% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2030 and carbon neutrality in 2050. Across its airport division specifically, this includes installation of photovoltaic power plants for electricity self-consumption in airports and engaging in deploying the environmental policy AirPact on all the airports in its network.

This will reduce VINCI AIrports' direct environmental impacts by halving greenhouse gas emissions and water consumption, cut plant-protection products and waste to landfill as well as optimise the impact of its clients' activity.

Original report: VINCI commits for the environment.

  • 40% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2030
  • Alignment with the 2050 carbon neutrality commitment made by France as part of the Paris Climate Agreement
  • Commitments to boost the circular economy and preserve natural environments

The VINCI Group is mobilizing all its business divisions to define an ambitious environmental strategy.

2019 was devoted to identifying actions likely to improve the Group's environmental performance in three areas: greenhouse gas emissions, resource preservation by developing the circular economy and conservation of natural environments. This strategy mobilised all of VINCI's operational entities. The factors of progress and transformative investments identified make it possible to:
- define a trajectory aimed at reaching carbon neutrality in 2050, with a first milestone of a 40% reduction in CO2 emissions by 2030 compared to 2018, as concerns direct impacts. This ambitious target is compatible with a trajectory for maintaining the rise in global temperature to 2 degrees maximum by the end of the century.
- systematically roll out the recycling and reuse policy, working on both materials supply and demand for each activity stream.
- adopt a "zero net loss" of biodiversity target in the framework of the "Avoid, Reduce, Offset" approach.
- strive to improve the indirect carbon footprint generated by the activities of suppliers, partners and customers.

For VINCI's own activities, implementing this shared ambition will involve an investment programme amounting to several hundreds of millions of euros, through actions such as:

Vehicles and site machinery
- Accelerated replacement of light and utility vehicle fleets by electric or less carbon-intensive vehicles
- Experimentation with hydrogen and biogas-type fuels for utility vehicles
- Replacement of part of the site machinery fleet by hybrid machinery, promotion of eco-driving practices and installation of continuous consumption-tracking sensors

Buildings
- Conduct of diagnostic studies on the Group's operational buildings inventory with a view to introducing energy efficiency actions: renovation, LED relamping, temperature regulation
- Anticipation of regulations through the eco-design of buildings approaches
- Development of high energy and environmental performance worksite facilities, notably timber-based

Energy transformation
- Replacement of heavy fuel oil and coal by natural gas or renewable-source gas in asphalt-mixing plants
- Replacement of the fossil energy used in binder storage facilities by electricity
- Installation of photovoltaic power plants for electricity self-consumption in airports

Preservation of natural environments
- Replacement of plant protection products by mechanical or powered weed-cutters
- Tracking of water consumption through across-the-board installation of individual meters
- Development of earthworks techniques that reduce the quantity of water required to sprinkle vehicle tracks by 40%

Furthermore, to enable alignment with the 2 degree trajectory of maintaining the rise in global temperature to 2 degrees maximum defined by the Paris Climate Agreement, VINCI is engaged in research and development actions and scientific and technological partnerships, notably with ParisTech. The Group's innovation policy focuses primarily on the environment, acting through the Group's business activities and Leonard, the Groups'foresight and innovation platform, notably through intrapreneurship and start-up nurturing programmes.

Over and above the action plans developed for each of its own activity streams, VINCI also undertakes to work on improving the indirect carbon footprint generated by the activities of its suppliers, partners and customers.

- VINCI Autoroutes, for instance, is leading a "Low-carbon motorway" project, which consists of massive decarbonation of each km travelled through solutions linked to reduction of vehicle emissions (electric vehicles, hydrogen-powered vehicles, etc.), practices (densification of road mobility: carpooling, buses, etc.) and coordination of transport modes (development of intermodality and the infrastructure facilitating it).

- Again in the concessions business, VINCI Airports is engaged in deploying the environmental policy AirPact on all the airports in its network, which, above and beyond reduction of its direct environmental impacts (halving of greenhouse gas emissions and water consumption, zero use of plant-protection products and zero waste to landfill), involves proactive actions to optimise the impact of its clients' activity.

In the construction sector, VINCI entities have also initiated many different approaches:
- experimental initiatives upstream of the future environmental regulation concerning buildings (Energy Positive and Carbon Reduction – E+C-)
- recourse to very low-carbon concretes and decarbonated recycled materials
- development of innovative environmental solutions, such as:
   · the "100% recycled road" patented by Eurovia;
   · Power Road®, an innovation that captures solar energy, stores it underground and reuses it to de-ice the road network or supply heat to buildings located in the vicinity;
   · Oxygen®, developed by VINCI Construction France, an eco-engagement providing a performance and assistance guarantee for building users;
   · Hub Energy, an energy-tracking tool applying know-how (energy diagnostics and audits, monitoring, optimisation, etc.) in energy performance contracts.

As part of the deployment of its environmental ambitions, VINCI commits to communicating every six months on the progress made in its action plan.

"With the deployment of its new environmental ambitions, VINCI today commits to developing concrete solutions that help improve the living environment to serve inhabitants, while also reducing the impact of its own activities. It is our responsibility as a leading economic actor and it is also a guarantee of the continued survival and acceptability of our business activities", said Isabelle Spiegel, Environment director for VINCI.

Swedavia: it is 'absolutely essential' to develop infrastructure adapted to fossil-free aviation

Swedavia, commenting on plans to develop a third parallel runway at Stockholm Arlanda Airport, argued (15-Jan-2020) it is "absolutely essential" to develop solutions and infrastructure adapted to the fossil-free aviation of the future, and that runway capacity is "important in this context".

It noted the trend towards electric-powered aircraft will lead to a more varied fleet of aircraft, adding electric aircraft operating shorter distances will eventually coexist with jet aircraft that run on biofuels and serve longer distances

Original report: A third parallel runway.

Air transport creates essential conditions for Sweden’s competitiveness, growth and prosperity. It links the country together and links Sweden to the rest of the world. As the owner of Sweden’s national basic infrastructure of airports – with Stockholm Arlanda as the hub – Swedavia is responsible for ensuring that the airports are properly designed with the right capacity for future needs but also for driving the work to bring about fossil-free travel in Sweden by 2045. In order for Arlanda to handle future travel volumes as well as the transition to fossil-free flights, a third parallel runway needs to be in place by around 2035. But preparing for and building a runway takes a long time and requires major investments. The preparatory work has begun, and a national pooling of resources is now required for the necessary transformation of air transport and the equally necessary long-term development of Arlanda as a critical component of Sweden’s transport infrastructure.

Good access both within Sweden and to the rest of the world is an essential condition for Sweden’s growth, prosperity and sustainability. It is therefore crucial for all of Sweden’s development that Stockholm Arlanda is given conditions to develop into an attractive, well-functioning airport. Swedavia works to ensure that Arlanda will be the leading airport in the Nordic region. That means Arlanda will be a safe, smooth airport with rapid flows and direct routes to attractive destinations. It will also be a pioneer and role model in sustainability and the travel of the future.

There has long been discussion about how many runways Stockholm Arlanda needs. Today there are three runways – two parallel ones that determine the airport’s capacity and a third, crossing runway that does not contribute to capacity but creates some redundancy and reduces noise load. After many years of growth, passenger volume has fallen over the past year. However, Swedavia’s long-term forecasts, which are based on the assumption that the transition to fossil-free air transport will be carried out, indicate an increase from 26 million passengers a year today to 40 million in 2040. In that case, a third parallel runway must be completed by around 2035. Otherwise, there will be a lack of capacity that will affect the competitiveness and prosperity of all Sweden. But the question of a third parallel runway is complex. It may therefore be appropriate here to highlight a number of factors concerning runway capacity in general and Arlanda’s conditions in particular.

It is sometimes emphasised in the debate that other airports handle more passengers than Stockholm Arlanda with the same number of parallel runways. This can be interpreted as meaning that what is needed is more efficient traffic at Arlanda, rather than an additional runway. Such an analysis ignores the fact that every airport has unique conditions in terms of function, geography, local weather conditions, air transport market and traffic patterns, and these affect the need for runway capacity. In Arlanda’s case, there are a number of factors that make it necessary to have higher runway capacity than at some other airports in Europe. One such factor is that the airport’s traffic pattern has a clear peak structure, which means that most departures and arrivals are concentrated within a few hours during the morning and evening. The traffic pattern is determined by what times of the day most people need to fly. Some have to make it in time to meetings in other parts of Sweden or elsewhere in Europe, while others need to catch connecting flights from other airports elsewhere in the world. There is thus limited potential to redirect traffic to other times of the day. Another factor that determines the need for a third parallel runway is that Arlanda needs to handle both fast jet planes and slow propeller aircraft. This mix of fast and slow aircraft makes the airport less efficient than an airport served by a more uniform fleet of aircraft. At many of the largest international airports, traffic is spread evenly over the traffic day and consists almost solely of jet planes, since smaller, slower aircraft serving domestic routes often operate at nearby airports.

The trend towards electric-powered aircraft will also lead to a more varied fleet of aircraft. The first commercial electric aircraft will be much smaller than the aircraft today that run on fossil fuel and will primarily be used for shorter routes. Electric aircraft flying shorter distances will coexist with jet planes that run on biofuel and fly longer distances. It is absolutely essential to develop solutions and infrastructure that are adapted to the fossil-free aviation of the future in order to make the transition to sustainable air transport. Runway capacity is important in this context.

There is great uncertainty as to exactly when another runway needs to be completed. This depends on the passenger volume trend, which in turn depends on how the transition to fossil-free air transport progresses based on the industry’s road map. What we know for certain is that, given the traffic situation today, it would be impossible to handle the traffic from Bromma Stockholm Airport using Stockholm Arlanda’ s existing runways without this having a negative impact on access.

Swedavia works to make Stockholm Arlanda a modern airport that contributes to growth and prosperity for all of Sweden. At the same time, we carry out world-leading work to reduce emissions from the airport. It is high time that we prioritise the investments that both increase Arlanda’s capacity and prepare the airport for the fossil-free air transport of tomorrow. Swedavia’s best estimate at present is that a third parallel runway needs to be in place by around 2035. For this to be possible, planning and preparations for the long and vital process for a new environmental permit have begun. A national pooling of resources for the necessary transition to fossil-free air transport by 2045 and for the necessary long-term development of Sweden’s critical infrastructure is both desirable and needed. We are thus calling for conditions that have solid political backing for the continued work to make Arlanda the leading airport in the Nordic region. In this context, explicit, broad political support for a third parallel runway would be particularly welcome.

Schiphol Group commits to implement nitrogen reduction measures on advice from Remkes Committee

Royal Schiphol Group stated (15-Jan-2020) it has acknowledged the "workable advice" from the Remkes Committee advisory council on nitrogen reduction. "Schiphol is aware of its responsibility and, together with the sector and in line with the advice of the Remkes Committee, wants to make an effort to realise the necessary measures", the group continued.

Measures include electrification of ground vehicles, including public transport and aircraft taxiing vehicles, encouraging airlines to operate cleaner and quieter aircraft through fleet renewal and internal and external carbon offsetting where possible as part of efforts to reach zero net emissions by 2030.

Original report: Duidelijk en werkbaar advies van Commissie-Remkes

Royal Schiphol Group is het Adviescollege erkentelijk dat het de relatie tussen luchtvaart en stikstof heeft onderzocht en adviseert over oplossingen. Schiphol heeft vanaf het eerste moment aangegeven bij te willen dragen. Zoals het Adviescollege in haar eerste rapport stelt: “Alle economische sectoren die stikstofuitstoot kennen, dienen een bijdrage te leveren, in een evenwichtige verhouding, waarbij kosteneffectiviteit in ogenschouw wordt genomen.” 

De Commissie beschrijft de relatief bescheiden bijdrage van de luchtvaart en concludeert dat de beeldvorming over de luchtvaart als grote vervuiler voor stikstof niet in overeenstemming is met de werkelijkheid.

Schiphol is zich bewust van haar verantwoordelijkheid en wil zich - samen met de sector en in lijn met het advies van de commissie Remkes - inzetten om de noodzakelijke maatregelen te realiseren. Dit betreft onder meer: 

  • Het pad naar zero emissie luchthavens in 2030, met de grootste elektrische bus vloot van Europa, elektrisch (openbaar) vervoer van en naar Schiphol, gebruik van walstroom voor vliegtuigen en de ontwikkeling van elektrisch taxiën.
  • Schiphol stimuleert via haar tarieven luchtvaartmaatschappijen gebruik te maken van stillere en schonere vliegtuigen. Mede hierdoor wordt de vliegtuigvloot verder vernieuwd. Het opschalen van het gebruik van duurzame vliegtuigbrandstoffen is de volgende stap.

​De Commissie geeft aan dat in aanvulling, net als in andere sectoren, gebruik gemaakt kan worden van mogelijkheden zoals intern en extern salderen.

Met dit advies geeft de commissie een duidelijke opdracht, maar ook een werkbaar advies. Dit stelt het kabinet in staat de politieke besluitvorming over Lelystad en Schiphol af te ronden.
Dick Benschop, CEO Royal Schiphol Group

Aéroports de la Côte d'Azur details net-zero emissions 2030 strategy

Aéroports de la Côte d'Azur presented (15-Jan-2020) its plan to achieve net-zero emissions across its airport network by 2030. Details include:

  • Saint Tropez La Mole Airport will achieve the target in 2020 through further reductions in emissions and the installation of carbon sinks enabling it to absorb residual emissions. From 2022, the airport will become a net absorber of 2.5 tonnes of CO2 p/a to 21 tonnes p/a by 2034;
  • Cannes Mandelieu Airport will follow the same trajectory with five emission reduction stages until 2030 when it reaches zero net emissions, followed by becoming a net absorber of 14 tonnes of CO2 p/a from 2034;
  • Nice Cote d'Azur Airport will reduce its CO2 emissions by 83% in 2020 with the electrification of its ground service vehicles, supporting sustainable aviation fuels, financing tram connections between Nice and the airport and enforcement of ground handling procedures such as single-engine taxiing. The phase-out of LPG powered buildings and replacement with photovoltaic surfaces will enable the airport to achieve its objective of no longer emitting greenhouse gases in 2030, and become an absorber of CO2 with the development of carbon sinks.

Aéroports de la Côte d'Azur chairman Dominique Thillaud commented: "Our strategic plan is to reconcile economic logic and environmental logic. There is a way to bring these two logics together, which we are taking. We want to be a pioneer in order to demonstrate to the industry that it is possible" (La Tribune, 15-Jan-2020).

Original report: AÉROPORTS DE LA CÔTE D’AZUR DÉVOILE SON PROGRAMME POUR PARVENIR EN SEULEMENT 10 ANS, À NE PLUS ÉMETT

Engagé depuis plus de 15 ans dans une démarche volontaire de réduction de son empreinte environnementale, le premier groupe aéroportuaire français 100% neutre carbone a dévoilé son programme pour parvenir, avec 20 ans d’avance sur sa précédente annonce, à ne plus émettre un seul gramme de gaz à effet de serre, sans compensation. Il entend également jouer un rôle d’aiguillon pour l’ensemble de la filière aéronautique en proposant des mesures concrètes pour limiter l’impact du transport aérien.

Le Groupe Aéroports de la Côte d’Azur annonce une série de mesures pour parvenir à réduire à néant les émissions de gaz à effet de serre des trois aéroports qu’il gère, Nice Côte d’Azur, Cannes Mandelieu et Golfe de Saint-Tropez. Ce programme prolonge les multiples engagements du Groupe et marque une nette accélération de son calendrier. En effet, s’il s’était engagé, en juin 2019 aux côtés de 192 aéroports européens, sur une échéance à horizon 2050, il vient de dévoiler les étapes nécessaires pour y parvenir en seulement 10 ans.

Benoit Piccard
Cette ambition a été saluée par le docteur Bertrand Piccard, fondateur et Président de la Fondation Solar Impulse, qui n’a pu faire le déplacement à Nice à l’occasion de la présentation du programme mais a tenu à délivrer un message de soutien bienveillant : « J’admire les sociétés qui se fixent spontanément des objectifs ambitieux. Devant la lenteur des négociations internationales, c’est en effet la meilleure façon d’avancer pour protéger l’environnement. De par son ambition à être Net Zéro Emission au plus tard en 2030, Aéroports de la Côte d’Azur devient un pionnier et un exemple à suivre dans le monde de l’aviation. Afin d’atteindre son but le plus rapidement possible, Aéroports de la Côte d’Azur va utiliser des solutions labellisées par la Fondation Solar Impulse. Un contrat vient d’ailleurs d’être signé avec l’une d’elle, Antismog ».

Un premier aéroport Net Zéro Emission dès 2020
En raison de leurs différentes spécificités, chacune des trois plateformes avancera à son rythme.
Ainsi, l’aéroport du Golfe de Saint-Tropez, neutre carbone depuis 2018, parviendra dès 2020 à ne plus émettre un seul gramme de gaz à effet de serre grâce à une nouvelle réduction de ses émissions et à l’installation de puits de carbone lui permettant d’absorber in situ les 23 tonnes eq. CO2 d’émissions résiduelles. Mieux, dès 2022, la poursuite de ces efforts permettra à la plateforme de devenir absorbeur net, de 2,5 tonnes eq. CO2 avant une montée en puissance jusqu’à 21 tonnes en 2034. Ainsi, l’aéroport prolongera sa contribution à la préservation de son territoire en absorbant les émissions des avions à l’approche, au roulage ou au décollage, étapes émissives du transport aérien ne rentrant pas dans le périmètre des émissions lui étant directement imputables.
L’aéroport de Cannes Mandelieu suivra la même trajectoire avec cinq étapes de réduction des émissions jusqu’en 2030, année d’atteinte de l’objectif de zéro émission. Ensuite, à partir de 2034, la plateforme pourra même absorber un minimum de 14 tonnes éq. CO2 par an.

Le deuxième aéroport de France, non émissif en 10 ans
L’aéroport Nice Côte d’Azur relève pour sa part un challenge encore plus important. Avec un trafic passagers en croissance constante chaque année, il est le deuxième aéroport de France derrière le hub de Paris et ouvre chaque année de nouvelles lignes, courts, moyens et longs courriers. Premier aéroport de France à avoir atteint la neutralité carbone, en 2016, il a déjà réussi à réduire de 80% ses émissions de gaz à effet de serre en 10 ans. « Aujourd’hui, un passager qui transite par nos terminaux représente à peine 100 grammes de CO2, c’est 92% de moins que dans la moyenne des aéroports européens et un record autant qu’une incitation à faire encore mieux. Ces derniers grammes sont les plus difficiles à supprimer car ils nous confrontent à des barrières techniques ou technologiques, que nous allons lever pour atteindre l’objectif de ne plus émettre un seul gramme en seulement 10 ans », explique Isabelle Vandrot, chef du département Développement durable et Environnement d’Aéroports de la Côte d’Azur.

Dans le détail, l’aéroport aura réduit de 83% ses émissions en 2020 grâce à l’électrification de 80% de ses véhicules de service, puis de 86% en 2021 par la suppression du gaz dans son terminal Fret et son pôle Technique. La suppression progressive du gaz dans l’ensemble des bâtiments, le développement de surfaces photovoltaïques ou la décarbonation des engins spéciaux lui permettront de parvenir à son objectif de ne plus émettre de gaz à effet de serre en 2030. Mieux, dès 2034, grâce à des puits de carbone, l’aéroport deviendra un absorbeur du CO2 émis par les avions s’y posant, prolongeant ainsi ses efforts au-delà de son seul périmètre.

Engager largement tout le secteur du transport aérien
Car c’est tout l’enjeu que souhaite adresser le Groupe. « Agir à notre niveau pour réduire à zéro notre empreinte environnementale n’a de sens que si les émissions sont réduites sur toute la chaîne. Et une étape importante est la réduction des émissions lors des phases d’approche, de roulage et de décollage. C’est ce que l’on appelle le cycle LTO », justifie Dominique Thillaud, président du Directoire d’Aéroports de la Côte d’Azur. « Sur Nice, ce cycle représente 10,75 kg de CO2 par passager. C’est le bilan carbone d’une seule mangue d’origine tropicale par exemple (source : Ademe FoodGES ). Il a baissé de 20% au cours des cinq dernières années alors que nous avons accueilli 2,5% d’avions de plus dans le même temps. Cela signifie qu’il est possible d’avoir à la fois de la croissance de trafic et de la décroissance d’émission. C’est encourageant et nous voulons aller plus loin, plus vite. »

Pour cela, le Groupe a présenté une série de mesures, concrètes, immédiatement applicables, permettant de diminuer l’impact environnemental du secteur aérien.

D’une part, pour l’ensemble des aéroports :

Généraliser des passerelles 400Hz qui fournissent en électricité les avions au stationnement, leur permettant de faire fonctionner les appareils de bord sans utiliser les moteurs auxiliaires, particulièrement émissifs et bruyants ;
Généraliser des pop-out, bornes d’approvisionnement en électricité pour les avions ne stationnant pas en passerelle ;
Basculer leur flotte de véhicules en 100% électrique ;
Signer des contrats de fourniture d’électricité garantie verte et d’origine française ;
Soutenir la création et le développement d’une offre de mobilité douce pour connecter l’aéroport à son territoire ;
Anticiper l’arrivée sur le marché d’une offre de Sustainable Aviation Fuel ;
S’engager dans la démarche Airport Carbon Accreditation pour parvenir à la neutralité carbone ;
Prolonger cette démarche en parvenant à ne plus émettre de GES d’ici 2050.
« Notre démarche, aussi vertueuse qu’elle puisse sembler, n’est finalement qu’une évidente application du principe de bon sens. Sur Nice, notre électricité est verte et alimentent toutes nos passerelles et pop-out, nous avons financé l’arrivée du tramway sur nos terminaux et mis en service des navettes passagers 100% électriques. Nous sommes neutres depuis 2016 et seront au rendez-vous de 2030 », indique Dominique Thillaud.

D’autre part pour les compagnies aériennes.

Systématiser la procédure de roulage avec un seul moteur (Single Engine Taxi Procedure), qui permet de diviser par deux les émissions en phase de roulage ;
Promouvoir le Sustainable Aviation Fuel ;
Passer d’une logique de compétitivité économique à une logique de compétitivité écologique, grâce à la mise en œuvre, sous l’égide de l’Etat, de deux mesures.
Impulsion étatique :

Moduler l’ « éco »-contribution, qui taxe les billets d’avion au départ ou à l’arrivée d’aéroports français, privilégiant les aéroports ayant déjà atteints la neutralité carbone, dans une fourchette comprise entre 10% et 50%. Cela représenterait un critère de compétitivité écologique pour les compagnies et fonctionnerait comme un aiguillon pour les aéroports n’ayant pas encore atteint cette neutralité carbone. Les passagers et les territoires en seraient les immédiats bénéficiaires.
Moduler de manière volontariste des redevances aéroportuaires en fonction de l’empreinte environnementale effective de chaque type d’avion. Ainsi, les compagnies seraient davantage incitées à renouveler leurs flottes et à investir dans des appareils tels que l’A321neo qui consomme en moyenne 1.9 litres de kérosène aux 100 km par passager. On passerait ainsi du punitif à l’incitatif, de la ponction à l’action.
« Ces deux leviers sont là, devant nous, et adossés à des réalités : des gammes d’avions disponibles qui s’inscrivent dans une trajectoire de performance énergétique se rapprochant de celle des voitures hybrides ; des aéroports, comme Nice qui figure parmi les plus fréquentés d’Europe tout en ayant su réduire de plus de 80% ses émissions de gaz à effet de serre et atteindre la neutralité carbone. La logique de compétitivité écologique, c’est une nouvelle vision de l’économie du secteur aérien au service de l’accélération de sa R&D et de la préservation des Territoires », conclue Dominique Thillaud.

Dortmund Airport website now CO2 neutral

Dortmund Airport joined (15-Jan-2020) the 'CO2 neutral website' programme as of the beginning of 2020. CO2 emissions caused by the operation of the website and its electricity consumption are now compensated for through financial participation in verified climate projects. More than 2500 companies worldwide have joined the programme.

The airport has achieved an 85% reduction in emissions compared to 2010 levels, and reiterated its plans to become carbon neutral by 2050.

Original report: Flughafen-Website ist CO2-neutral

Dortmund Airport nimmt am Programm „CO2-neutrale Website“ teil.

Seit Beginn des Jahres ist der Ruhrgebietsflughafen Mitglied der Initiative „CO2-neutrale Website“. Die durch den Betrieb der Internetseite bzw. deren Stromverbrauch verursachten CO2-Emissionen werden ab sofort durch die finanzielle Beteiligung an geprüften Klimaprojekten kompensiert.

Projekte der Initiative „CO2-neutrale Website“
Der in Dänemark gegründeten Initiative „CO2-neutrale Website“ schlossen sich bereits mehr als 2.500 Unternehmen weltweit an. Gemeinsam helfen sie, CO2-Emissionen global zu reduzieren und zu neutralisieren. Zu diesem Zweck fördert die Initiative u. a. die Errichtung erneuerbarer Energiequellen wie Windkraftanlagen. 

Nachhaltigkeit am Dortmund Airport
Die Beteiligung des Dortmund Airport an der Initiative ist nur eine von vielen Maßnahmen zur nachhaltigen Entwicklung des Flughafens. Der hohen gesellschaftlichen Verantwortung wird in der gesamten Unternehmenskultur des Dortmunder Flughafens Rechnung getragen. Im Dezember 2019 veröffentlichte der Dortmund Airport den vierten Nachhaltigkeitsbericht seit 2013. „Wir haben die in unserem Einfluss liegenden CO2-Emissionen bezogen auf 2010 bereits um 85 Prozent gesenkt“, stellte Flughafen-Chef Udo Mager fest. Der Dortmunder Flughafen hat sich zum Ziel gesetzt, bis 2050 klimaneutral zu sein.

Erfahren Sie mehr über die Ziele und Maßnahmen zur nachhaltigen Entwicklung am Dortmund Airport.

Tourism New Zealand: 93% of New Zealanders agree international tourism is good

Tourism New Zealand revealed (16-Jan-2020) the following highlights from 'The Mood of the Nation' research, conducted by Kantar TNS on behalf of Tourism New Zealand and Tourism Industry Aotearoa:

  • 93% of New Zealanders agree international tourism is good for New Zealand;
  • 39% believe pressure on infrastructure remains a top priority;
  • 22% of New Zealanders issue concern about impacts on the environment;
  • 13% are concerned about traffic and congestion;
  • 13% issue concern with overcrowding of national parks and great walks

Original report: Kiwis agree - tourism and its benefit to communities continue to be good for New Zealand

Kiwis agree - tourism and its benefit to communities continue to be good for New Zealand

Mood of the Nation research released today reveals 93 percent of New Zealanders agree that international tourism is good for New Zealand.

The Mood of the Nation research is undertaken by Kantar TNS on behalf of Tourism New Zealand and Tourism Industry Aotearoa in November and March each year, to measure New Zealanders’ perceptions of international tourism.

The survey results show New Zealanders’ views are stable across key areas like perceptions of tourism pressure as New Zealand enters a cycle of slowed international holiday visitor arrival growth.

“Tourism is New Zealand’s number one export earner, it's vital to communities across the country providing one in every seven jobs, so it’s fantastic that Kiwis see the benefits it delivers,” says Tourism New Zealand Chief Executive Stephen England-Hall.

“This research is incredibly important to help us understand how Kiwis are feeling about tourism so the government and industry can take action to ensure that the sector gives back more than it takes to our country and people.”

The research also shows that Kiwis remain proud that their country is an attractive visitor destination but have concerns about the impact it can have in particular areas. Pressure on infrastructure remains the top concern for New Zealanders (39%) followed by impacts on the environment (22%) with concern about traffic congestion and overcrowding of national parks and great walks both at 13%.

A range of initiatives and investment are in place to address these pressures. The International Visitor Levy (IVL) is expected to raise over $450 million over 5 years, funding projects to ensure our country and our people get the best from tourism growth. The Tourism Infrastructure Fund (TIF) provides up to $25 million annually to support regions in developing critical tourism infrastructure.

UK Health secretary Matt Hancock: 'We shouldn't be flying less' (BBC news report)

Health secretary Matt Hancock has told BBC Radio 5 Live Breakfast that he thinks connecting flights around the UK are “incredibly important” and we shouldn’t be flying less despite air travel’s contributions to carbon emissions.

The government has stepped in to help save Flybe - the UK's biggest regional airline outside London.

More than eight million people fly with the regional airline each year to and from airports in the UK, as well as to Europe.

Aviation Environment Federation: 'No justification for cutting APD to save Flybe'

Aviation Environment Federation (AEF) responded (14-Jan-2020) to reports the UK Government is considering cutting air passenger duty (APD) on all domestic flights in order to save Flybe from having to cease operations. AEF deputy director Cait Hewitt said: "With aviation growth posing a threat to the UK's ability to meet its net zero climate target, there can be no justification for a tax cut designed to boost sales by a failing airline.

The only way the proposed APD cut could save Flybe would be by attracting new customers – encouraging people to make trips they wouldn't otherwise have made, or incentivising them to switch from rail or coach options and onto aircraft – moving us even further away from delivering the sustainable transport policy the Government says it's committed to"

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