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Aviation Sustainability and the Environment, CAPA 28-Jan-2020

Analysis

Headlines

UNWTO and UNEP launch Global Tourism Plastics Initiative

China's aviation carbon emissions could quadruple by 2050

Amadeus cuts data centre emissions to zero in 2019

AerFin joins AFRA, commits to recycling

Environment Ministry encourages German govt employees to choose rail over air transport for domestic travel

French Govt launches SAF production roadmap out to 2050

French govt launches EoI for SAF production in French aeronautical industry

French aeronautical and fuel companies welcome govt biofuel investment EoI

French Secretary of State for Transport: Biofuels 'necessary' but alone 'not sufficient'

A4A: US carriers contribute 2% to US greenhouse gas emissions

Bristol Airport CEO: Move to a lower carbon future 'absolutely critical'

Leeds Climate Commission: Terminals depending on more flights will not improve climate perspective

Uttlesford District Council refuses Stansted Airport expansion

Calgary Airport opens new deicing apron constructed using CarbonCure concrete

This CAPA report contains a brief summary of aviation environment reports issued in recent days.
They form part of CAPA's 400 daily aviation subscription news alerts

UNWTO and UNEP launch Global Tourism Plastics Initiative

UN World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) announced (22-Jan-2020) the launch of the Global Tourism Plastics Initiative, in collaboration with the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. This initiative unites the tourism sector behind a common vision to tackle the root causes of plastic pollution, enabling businesses and governments to take joint action. The initiative aims to reduce the amount of plastic pollution caused by the tourism sector. To achieve this vision, tourism companies and destinations will be required to make a set of concrete and actionable commitments by 2025, including to: 

  • Eliminate problematic or unnecessary plastic packaging and items by 2025; 
  • Take action to move from single-use to reuse models or reusable alternatives by 2025; 
  • Engage the value chain to move towards 100% of plastic packaging to be reusable, recyclable, or compostable; 
  • Take action to increase the amount of recycled content across all plastic packaging and items used; 
  • Commit to collaborate and invest to increase the recycling and composting rates for plastics; 
  • Report publicly and annually on progress made towards these targets.

Original report: Global Tourism Plastics Initiative Takes On One Of The Worst Polluters

Global Tourism Plastics Initiative Takes On One Of The Worst Polluters

The Global Tourism Plastics Initiative is officially announced today by the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), in collaboration with the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. This initiative unites the tourism sector behind a common vision to tackle the root causes of plastic pollution, enabling businesses and governments to take joint action.

The Global Tourism Plastics Initiative is ground-breaking and ambitious in its goals. It aims to reduce the amount of plastic pollution caused by the tourism sector. To achieve this vision, tourism companies and destinations will be required to make a set of concrete and actionable commitments by 2025, including to: 

  • Eliminate problematic or unnecessary plastic packaging and items by 2025; 
  • Take action to move from single-use to reuse models or reusable alternatives by 2025; 
  • Engage the value chain to move towards 100% of plastic packaging to be reusable, recyclable, or compostable; 
  • Take action to increase the amount of recycled content across all plastic packaging and items used; 
  • Commit to collaborate and invest to increase the recycling and composting rates for plastics; 
  • Report publicly and annually on progress made towards these targets. 

Plastic pollution is one of the major environmental challenges of our time, and tourism has an important role to play in contributing to the solution

UNWTO Secretary-General Zurab Pololikashvili said: “The Global Tourism Plastics Initiative is a unique opportunity for tourism companies and destinations to step forward and lead the global effort addressing plastic pollution. Frontrunning tourism companies and destinations will set quantifiable targets as part of the Global Tourism Plastics Initiative and accelerate the transformation of the tourism sector towards more integrated solutions and circular business models.”

The Initiative is a key activity of the Sustainable Tourism Programme of the One Planet Network and it acts as the interface for the tourism sector of the New Plastics Economy Global Commitment of the Ellen MacArthur Foundation. 

The New Plastics Economy Programme Manager Gerald Naber said: “The New Plastics Economy Global Commitment unites more than 450 businesses, governments and others behind a clear vision of a circular economy for plastics. We welcome the launch of the Global Tourism Plastics Initiative, led by UNEP and UNWTO, which unites the tourism sector behind this vision for a world in which plastic never becomes waste or pollution. It will be a challenging journey, but through concerted action, we can eliminate the plastics we don't need and innovate, so the plastics we do need can be safely and easily circulated – keeping them in the economy and out of the environment.” 

The Director of UN Environment’s Economy Division Director, Ms. Ligia Noronha, added: “Plastic pollution is one of the major environmental challenges of our time, and tourism has an important role to play in contributing to the solution. Through the Global Tourism Plastics Initiative, tourism companies and destinations are supported so they can innovate, eliminate and circulate the way they use plastics.” 

China's aviation carbon emissions could quadruple by 2050

China's aviation sector carbon emissions could be almost four times higher by 2050, according to a study entitled 'China's aircraft-related CO2 emissions: Decomposition analysis, decoupling status, and future trends' published in the Energy Policy journal (carbonbrief.org, 21-Jan-2020).

China's carbon emissions were ranked second in the world behind the US in 2018, accounting for 13% of global aviation emissions. On a per capita basis, China's emissions are relatively low but have the potential for considerable growth in the decades ahead. IATA predicts China will overtake the US as the world's largest air passenger market by 2029.

Original report: China's aircraft-related CO2 emissions: Decomposition analysis, decoupling status, and future trends

China's aircraft-related CO2 emissions: Decomposition analysis, decoupling status, and future trends

Highlights

4 factors and contribution ratios of CO2 emissions were analyzed by extended models.

  • Eight scenarios were established to analyze future CO2 emission trend.
  • Transport scale is leading factor and contributes 110% to the CO2 emissions growth.
  • Expansive coupling and expansive negative decoupling are current relationships.
  • CO2 emissions may raise 1.6 to 3.9 times in 2020–2050, complex measures are urgent.

Abstract:

In order to explore the decoupling relationship and its influence factors between the growth of China's civil aviation sector and carbon emissions, as well as to forecast future CO2 emissions, the extended log-mean Divisia index model (LMDI), Tapio decoupling model and an emission prediction model were applied in this study. The results show the following. (1) Total carbon emissions fluctuate on an overall upward trend, but the level of oil consumption per revenue tonne-kilometers (RTK) shows a steady downward trend. (2) Among the four main factors, the “transportation amount growth” factor contributed most to CO2 emissions increases; followed by transport structure adjustment effects and alternative fuel effects. The “energy consumption intensity” factor plays a major role in inhibiting CO2 emissions. (3) The decoupling state of civil aviation predominantly stayed in a weak decoupling prior to 1988, expansive coupling and expansive negative decoupling during 1988–2000, and expansive coupling post-2000, which implies that the government should take comprehensive measures to reduce CO2 emissions. (4) Based on eight scenarios, China's civil aviation sector is predicted to be responsible for 0.13 Gt of CO2 emissions by 2020. Between 2020 and 2050, CO2 emissions may increase by a factor 1.6 to 3.9.

Amadeus cuts data centre emissions to zero in 2019

Amadeus SVP general counsel & corporate secretary Tomas López Fernebrand, via the company's official blog, stated (24-Jan-2020) the company managed to reduce the net emissions at its data centre to zero in 2019. Mr Fernebrand reported this was achieved through the use of renewable energy. Energy consumption of Amadeus data centre represents more than 50% of the company's total energy consumption and CO2 emissions worldwide.

Original report: Staying committed to fighting climate change

Tomas López Fernebrand

Senior Vice President, General Counsel & Corporate Secretary, Amadeus

Combating climate change is a priority for every globally responsible corporate. At Amadeus we have felt the importance to keep greenhouse gases emissions under control for a long time now.

As a member of the Dow Jones Sustainability Index for eight years and currently in our seventh year of participating in the CDP (formerly known as Carbon Disclosure Project) annual survey, we are committed to the process of duly reporting our carbon footprint and ensuring we reduce our greenhouse gas emissions levels year-on-year.

CDP is without a doubt one of the most relevant sustainability benchmarks today. CDP runs a global disclosure system that enables companies, cities, states and regions to measure and manage their environmental impacts. It has built the most comprehensive collection of self-reported environmental data in the world, assessing the level of detail of the content reported, the company's awareness of climate change issues, management methods and progress towards action taken on climate change.

Our score in 2019 was B, which implies that Amadeus scores well in the areas of disclosure, awareness and management of climate change issues and that we are close to the leadership level - this is a good reference of our performance, as well as a way to identify industry trends and areas for continuous improvement.

Through the years we have developed a strategy to fight climate change that is based on three pillars:

     Reducing the environmental impact of our own operations 
     Fostering IT solutions to help our customers
     Working together with other industry stakeholders in common travel industry projects

 In 2019, we achieved a significant milestone at our data center, reducing our emissions to zero. This was achieved through the use of renewable energy. To truly understand the value of this achievement, consider the fact that energy consumption of our data center represents more than 50% of our total energy consumption and CO2 emissions worldwide.

As a leading travel technology company, we have also developed cutting edge IT solutions such as Altéa Departure Control-Flight Management, which, in addition to improving the operational efficiency of our customers, also helps them to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and save on fuel costs.

Our goal is to be a driving force within the industry to help accelerate the speed at which emissions are being tackled at a global level.

AerFin joins AFRA, commits to recycling

AerFin announced (27-Jan-2020) it has joined the Aircraft Fleet Recycling Association (AFRA). AerFin CEO Bob James said: "AerFin is committed to delivering environmentally and sustainable aircraft and engine recycling solutions and with 12,000 aircraft retirements forecast over the next decade, joining AFRA further strengthens our commitment to sustainability".

Original report: AerFin joins Aircraft Fleet Recycling Association (AFRA)

AerFin is delighted to announce that it has become the latest member to join AFRA. AerFin believes in providing cost-effective sustainable solutions to the aviation industry and joins other industry members in demonstrating their commitment to environmentally responsible management of end-of-life services.

AerFin is committed to delivering environmentally and sustainable aircraft and engine recycling solutions and with 12,000 aircraft retirements forecast over the next decade, joining AFRA further strengthens our commitment to sustainability.”
Bob James, CEO

AFRA is a membership-based global collaboration to elevate industry performance and increase commercial value for end-of-service aircraft. AFRA represents companies from across the globe and throughout the supply-chain from OEM’s to materials recyclers.

Environment Ministry encourages German govt employees to choose rail over air transport for domestic travel

Germany's Ministry of the Environment is encouraging employees to choose rail over air transport for the commute between Berlin and Bonn, where many ministerial offices are still located (dpa, 27-Jan-2020).

Other federal ministries reportedly also aim to promote rail travel as a way of lessening the environmental impact of government travel, with the Ministry of the Interior amending the Federal Travel Expenses Act to allow for rail travel to always be reimbursed as a travel expense, even in cases where it is more expensive than air transport.

French Govt launches SAF production roadmap out to 2050

France's Ministry for Ecological Transition launched (27-Jan-2020) a roadmap for the development of sustainable aviation fuels (SAF) in the French air transport sector. The roadmap builds on the 'Green Growth Engagement' (ECV) initiative launched in 2017 by the government alongside Air FranceAirbusSafran, Total and Suez Environnement. It forecasts a short term trajectory in terms of fossil fuel substitution with SAFs of 2% by 2025, 5% by 2030 and 50% by 2050. The Ministry stated: "The deployment of sustainable aviation biofuels is one of the priorities of the government, which will continue to work in this direction, in close cooperation with all the industrial actors concerned".

Original report: Lancement de la feuille de route pour des biocarburants aéronautiques durables dans le transport aérienne

Elisabeth Borne, ministre de la Transition écologique et solidaire, et Jean-Baptiste Djebbari, secrétaire d’Etat chargé des Transports, annoncent le lancement de la feuille de route pour des biocarburants aéronautiques durables dans le transport aérien français pour répondre au défi climatique et réduire son empreinte carbone.

Les biocarburants aéronautiques durables constituent un levier stratégique pour la réduction à court et moyen terme des émissions nettes du secteur qui dispose de peu d’alternatives énergétiques.

Signé en décembre 2017, l’Engagement pour la croissance verte (ECV), sur les biocarburants aéronautiques a permis de lancer la réflexion sur les conditions du déploiement d’une filière française. Il a associé l’État et cinq groupes industriels français : Air France, Airbus, Safran, Total et Suez Environnement.

Les ministères de la transition écologique et solidaire, de l’économie et de l’agriculture, ont défini, sur cette base, la feuille de route nationale, qui précise l’ambition et la stratégie que la France pourrait développer en matière de biocarburants aéronautiques durables dès 2025.

Cette feuille de route prévoit notamment une trajectoire de substitution à court-terme du kérosène fossile par des biocarburants durables de 2% en 2025 et de 5% en 2030. Amorcer le déploiement de ces produits à court-terme s’inscrit en cohérence avec la Stratégie nationale bas-carbone qui fixe un objectif de long terme de 50% en 2050.

Le déploiement des biocarburants aéronautiques durables constitue une des priorités du Gouvernement qui va continuer d’œuvrer en ce sens, en lien étroit avec l’ensemble des acteurs industriels concernés.

Afin de rendre très opérationnelle cette feuille de route nationale, les ministères de la transition écologique et solidaire, de l’économie et de l’agriculture lancent ce jour un appel à manifestation d’intérêt (AMI) sur la production de biocarburants aéronautiques durables. Cet AMI a pour objectif d’identifier les projets d’investissement dans des unités de production de biocarburants de deuxième génération, actuellement envisagés par les acteurs économiques en France, et en particulier les projets d’investissement dans des unités de production de biocarburants à destination de l’aéronautique.

French govt launches EoI for SAF production in French aeronautical industry

France's Ministry for Ecological Transition launched (27-Jan-2020) an EoI for the production of sustainable aviation fuels (SAF). The aim of the EoI is to identify investment projects in second-generation biofuel production units currently being considered by companies in France, and in particular investment projects in biofuel production for air transport.

Original report: Lancement de la feuille de route pour des biocarburants aéronautiques durables dans le transport aérienne

Elisabeth Borne, ministre de la Transition écologique et solidaire, et Jean-Baptiste Djebbari, secrétaire d’Etat chargé des Transports, annoncent le lancement de la feuille de route pour des biocarburants aéronautiques durables dans le transport aérien français pour répondre au défi climatique et réduire son empreinte carbone.

Les biocarburants aéronautiques durables constituent un levier stratégique pour la réduction à court et moyen terme des émissions nettes du secteur qui dispose de peu d’alternatives énergétiques.

Signé en décembre 2017, l’Engagement pour la croissance verte (ECV), sur les biocarburants aéronautiques a permis de lancer la réflexion sur les conditions du déploiement d’une filière française. Il a associé l’État et cinq groupes industriels français : Air France, Airbus, Safran, Total et Suez Environnement.

Les ministères de la transition écologique et solidaire, de l’économie et de l’agriculture, ont défini, sur cette base, la feuille de route nationale, qui précise l’ambition et la stratégie que la France pourrait développer en matière de biocarburants aéronautiques durables dès 2025.

Cette feuille de route prévoit notamment une trajectoire de substitution à court-terme du kérosène fossile par des biocarburants durables de 2% en 2025 et de 5% en 2030. Amorcer le déploiement de ces produits à court-terme s’inscrit en cohérence avec la Stratégie nationale bas-carbone qui fixe un objectif de long terme de 50% en 2050.

Le déploiement des biocarburants aéronautiques durables constitue une des priorités du Gouvernement qui va continuer d’œuvrer en ce sens, en lien étroit avec l’ensemble des acteurs industriels concernés.

Afin de rendre très opérationnelle cette feuille de route nationale, les ministères de la transition écologique et solidaire, de l’économie et de l’agriculture lancent ce jour un appel à manifestation d’intérêt (AMI) sur la production de biocarburants aéronautiques durables. Cet AMI a pour objectif d’identifier les projets d’investissement dans des unités de production de biocarburants de deuxième génération, actuellement envisagés par les acteurs économiques en France, et en particulier les projets d’investissement dans des unités de production de biocarburants à destination de l’aéronautique.

French aeronautical and fuel companies welcome govt biofuel investment EoI

Air FranceAirbusSafran, Suez and Total welcomed (27-Jan-2020) the French Government's launch of an EoI to identify investment projects in sustainable biofuel production in France. The companies stated the EoI is a "fundamental first step" towards the emergence of a sustainable aviation biofuel industry in France and will enable supportive measures and incentives in favour of investments in biofuel production.

Original report: AIRBUS, AIR FRANCE, SAFRAN, SUEZ ET TOTAL SALUENT LES AVANCÉES EN FAVEUR DE L’ÉMERGENCE D’UNE FILIÈR

Alors que le gouvernement français présente à Toulouse l’ambition de la France en matière de biocarburants durables pour l’aviation, Airbus, Air France, Safran, Suez et Total se félicitent du lancement d’un Appel à Manifestation d’Intérêt (AMI). L’ambition présentée s’appuie sur les conclusions du groupe de travail réunissant les services de l’État et les partenaires industriels, tous signataires, en décembre 2017, de l’Engagement pour la Croissance Verte (ECV).

Première étape fondamentale pour accompagner l’émergence de filières de production en France, cet AMI va permettre d’identifier les projets d’investissement dans des unités de production de biocarburants durables pour l’aviation de deuxième génération en France, mais aussi des mesures d’accompagnement et d’incitations permettant de favoriser ces investissements.

La mise en place d’une filière économiquement viable et pérenne est indispensable à l’accélération de l’utilisation des biocarburants durables dans l’aviation et donc à la réduction des émissions nettes de CO2 du transport aérien. Elle devra garantir et préserver la compétitivité de chacun des acteurs dans son environnement concurrentiel et s’inscrire dans une trajectoire internationale.

Depuis 18 mois, ces entreprises se sont mobilisées aux côtés de l’Etat pour promouvoir l’émergence de cette filière en France. Cette initiative constitue le premier partenariat innovant entre acteurs publics et privés dans ce domaine, détaillant les conditions d’émergence de filières françaises pérennes, sur la base des recommandations suivantes :

  • Mobiliser les volumes de matières premières nécessaires vers le secteur de l’aérien,
  • Garantir l’utilisation de ressources durables pour des biocarburants avancés, notamment issus de l’économie circulaire,
  • Assurer la viabilité économique de l’ensemble des acteurs de la chaine de valeur, grâce à des mécanismes incitatifs adaptés,
  • Utiliser les circuits de distribution logistiques aéroportuaires existants,
  • Soutenir le principe de diversification des filières de production.

Le déploiement des biocarburants durables pour l’aviation constitue un levier stratégique pour la réduction des émissions nettes de CO2 du transport aérien, avec une réduction sur l’ensemble du cycle de vie allant jusqu’à 80% avant mélange.

Airbus, Air France, Safran, Suez et Total saluent les avancées en faveur de l’émergence d’une filière de biocarburants durables pour l'aviation en France.

French Secretary of State for Transport: Biofuels 'necessary' but alone 'not sufficient'

France's Secretary of State for Transport Jean-Baptise Djebbari said (27-Jan-2020) sustainable biofuels are "necessary" but alone are "not sufficient" to meet the environmental targets set by international agreements. He noted focus must also be on technological breakthroughs such as hybrid and zero-emission aircraft. Mr Djebbari said the production of biofuel as a "first phase" is nonetheless "essential", adding: "It is necessary to launch it quickly and get results quickly".

Original report: Discours de Jean-Baptise Djebbari : Lancement de la feuille de route nationale pour le développement

Le 8 février 1919, Lucien Boussotrot, qui n’était pas toulousain mais corrézien, réalisait ce qui a été considéré comme le premier vol commercial entre Paris et Londres, plus précisément entre Toussus-le-Noble et Londres. Depuis quelques semaines, sur ce même terrain de Toussus-le-Noble, vole le premier avion électrique produit en série, aujourd’hui destiné à la formation au pilotage. Entre ces deux évènements, des révolutions successives avec l’essor du transport de masse, les vols supersoniques, le succès industriel de l’A320, le tournant du low-cost, la transformation de l’écosystème autour du numérique. Au centre de ces succès, des entreprises mondiales comme Airbus, Safran, Air France avec partout de l’emploi qualifié et territorialisé, des hommes et des femmes engagés.

Et pourtant depuis quelques mois, l’aviation a vu son image se ternir brutalement avec les grands débats environnementaux et sociétaux, tant en France qu’en Europe. Les gilets jaunes ont revendiqué l’équité fiscale, se sont indignés de l’exonération du kérosène, ont réclamé de privilégier le train. Ces réalités climatiques et politiques rappellent à tout un chacun que l’heure est à l’accélération de l’action.

Il y a donc nécessité à agir vite pour un secteur qui a déjà fait beaucoup.
Les esprits taquins diront que l’aviation a fait beaucoup car la frugalité énergétique est une condition majeure de compétitivité, que le fossile est l’ennemi du compte de résultats, et ils auront raison.

Mais force est de constater que depuis 10 ans, les progrès technologiques sont là. Ils contribuent à réduire de 15% à 25% les émissions de CO2 des avions récents comme l’A350 ou la famille des A320NEO par rapport à leurs prédécesseurs. Et je sais que la filière française va intensifier ses efforts de recherche pour que la prochaine génération d’avions, celle qui volera à partir de 2030 avec de vraies ruptures technologiques. Autrement dit, je sais que la filière française est taillée pour réaliser sa révolution environnementale avec des avions qui voleront demain à l’aide de carburants synthétiques, avec des opérations optimisées tirant pleinement profit de l’intelligence embarquée. Les Français, les Européens peuvent faire cette révolution et sa portée sera mondiale.

Aujourd’hui, nous posons la première pierre de ce grand projet écologique, industriel et territorial avec le lancement de la filière biocarburants. Avec une feuille de route donne un cadre à l’action de l’Etat et constitue une référence pour les acteurs privés. Une feuille de route qui fixe un objectif d’incorporation de biocarburants de 2% dès 2025, de 5% en 2030 et de 50% en 2050. Tout l’enjeu aujourd’hui porte sur la massification de la production des carburants aéronautiques durables. Pour cela, les ministères de l’écologie et de l’agriculture lancent aujourd’hui un appel à manifestation d’intérêt et je tiens à d’ores et déjà remercier les entreprises qui ont pris engagements forts ce matin.
Mais tout en disant cela, je veux tenir ici un discours de vérité. Les biocarburants durables seront nécessaires mais pas suffisants pour atteindre les objectifs environnementaux fixés par les accords internationaux, qui nous imposent d’émettre en 2050 la moitié de ce que nous émettions en 2005. Cela nous renvoie aux ruptures technologiques précédemment citées : l’avion hybride, l’avion à coût carbone nul et plus largement, la génération massive d’énergie décarbonée.  Pour autant cette première phase est essentielle. Il est nécessaire de la lancer vite et d’avoir rapidement des résultats.

Avant de céder la parole à Madame la Ministre qui reviendra sur le sujet qui nous occupe, je voudrais vous livrer deux convictions.
Ma première conviction est qu’évidemment la révolution environnementale de l’aviation est non seulement une nécessité et qu’elle constitue une opportunité.

Mais plus que ça, je suis convaincu que la révolution environnementale fait partie du destin de l’aviation car elle est dans son ADN et l’histoire récente nous a montré à quel point l’aéronautique, confronté à des défis, sait inventer vite, quitte à se réinventer.
Au fond, il s’agit ici de répondre politiquement à l’injonction environnementale par la voie du progrès et de l’intelligence collective plutôt que le choix de la résignation et d’une décroissance illusoire.

Ma seconde conviction est qu’ici, nous pouvons tisser les fils de la confiance entre élus, grands industriels, opérateurs aéronautiques, associations engagées et administrations. Et que l’action résolue de chacun permettra de faire advenir l’aviation décarbonée ; ce projet écologique et industriel, qui a besoin de l’intelligence des territoires pour prospérer, à l’image de l’écosystème vertueux qui s’est installé ici à Toulouse avec Airbus et ATR au bénéfice d’une grande partie de la région Occitanie

Pour conclure, je voudrais citer Pierre de Coubertin – qui s’y connaissait en dépassement de soi – disait que « chaque difficulté rencontrée doit être l’occasion d’un nouveau progrès ». Alors dans cette ville où le combat collectif est de nature si l’on pense à son équipe de rugby, dans cette ville qui est la « capitale mondiale de l’aéronautique », je suis convaincu que nous pouvons, sûrs de nous-mêmes et avec beaucoup de détermination, engager ensemble cette démarche de progrès.
Je vous remercie.

A4A: US carriers contribute 2% to US greenhouse gas emissions

Airlines for America (A4A) reported (24-Jan-2020) it is working with the US Government, airframe and engine manufacturers and airports to advance the further reduction of emissions, through projects such as air traffic modernisation and energy transformation. The organisation noted that US carriers currently carry 2.4 million passengers and 58,000 tons of cargo each day, contributing 2% to the US' greenhouse gas emissions.

Original report: U.S. airlines continue to grow greener as sustainability takes center stage in Davos

Leaders from around the world gathered at the 50th World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland this week to discuss key global issues including the economy, security and – of course — sustainability. Environmental concerns, including the importance of addressing climate change, are not new to WEF, and the public-private approach WEF champions for action has long been central to the U.S. airlines’ commitment to climate change and sustainability.

We connect and protect the planet while serving as a green economic engine. U.S. carriers transported 42 percent more passengers and cargo in 2018 than in 2000 with just a 3 percent increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Today, U.S carriers transport 2.4 million passengers and 58,000 tons of cargo per day, while contributing just 2 percent of the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions.

And, that’s not all. The world’s airlines, including U.S. carriers, have committed to the Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA), an international agreement that supports achieving carbon-neutral growth in international commercial aviation beginning in 2021. Moreover, our industry has committed to achieving a 50 percent net reduction in carbon dioxide emissions in 2050 relative to 2005 levels.

The industry continues to work toward further reducing emissions by investing in new, more fuel-efficient aircraft, sustainable alternative aviation fuels, air traffic control improvements, cutting-edge route-optimization software, carbon offsets and more. To advance these measures, we are working with the U.S. government, airframe and engine manufacturers, airports and others around the world in research and development projects, air traffic modernization, energy transformation and more – precisely the types of public-private collaborations WEF confirms are critical to green operations, infrastructure, technology and ensuring sustainability for generations to come.

U.S. airlines have a strong record on sustainability and are committed to doing our part. As leaders across the globe gather to discuss a myriad of environmental initiatives, U.S. carriers are proud to continue leading the fight against climate change and ensuring a sustainable future for all.

Bristol Airport CEO: Move to a lower carbon future 'absolutely critical'

27-Jan-2020 12:20

Bristol Airport CEO Dave Lees said: "The move to a lower carbon future for aviation is absolutely critical... Climate change is a responsibility for all of us, and aviation, whilst a small contributor to overall carbon emissions, needs to play a greater leadership role in developing and implementing new technology" (International Airport Review, 24-Jan-2020). 

Leeds Climate Commission: Terminals depending on more flights will not improve climate perspective

Leeds Climate Commission chairman Andy Gouldson stated: "An energy efficient airport that depends on more and more flights will take Leeds further away from its carbon neutral target – a target that many people and businesses are working hard to achieve" (Yorkshire Evening Post, 24-Jan-2020). Mr Gouldson added: "From a climate perspective, a better terminal with the same or fewer flights would be an improvement on the existing situation, but a better terminal that depends on more flights wouldn't".

Uttlesford District Council refuses Stansted Airport expansion

Uttlesford District Council refused (24-Jan-2020) to grant approval for London Stansted Airport's expansion plans on the grounds of noise, air quality and climate change. As previously reported by CAPA, the airport submitted an expansion application to optimise runway use and increase capacity to 43 million passengers p/a.

Original report: Stansted Airport planning application

This comes after a Planning Committee meeting in November 2018 at which the committee resolved to grant approval of the application subject to the S106 Agreement.

Plans to increase the passenger cap at Stansted Airport have been refused by Uttlesford District Council's Planning Committee at an extraordinary meeting today (24 January).

The reasons for today's refusal were made in relation to noise, air quality and climate change, matters that the committee agreed were material planning changes since the approval was granted.

Calgary Airport opens new deicing apron constructed using CarbonCure concrete

YYC Calgary International Airport opened (24-Jan-2020) its new east aircraft deicing apron, constructed using CarbonCure Technologies' reduced carbon concrete. The construction in Aug/Sep-2019 marked the second largest pour of CarbonCure concrete in a single project and the largest quantity to be used at an airport in Canada. CarbonCure injects waste CO2 captured by industrial gas suppliers into concrete during mixing, using an average of 16kg of carbon emissions per cubic metre of concrete. The east deicing apron project used more than 25,000 cubic metres of concrete, realising 160 tonnes of carbon savings.

Original report: High-tech, low-carbon concrete project a Canadian first at YYC Calgary International Airport

Canadian cleantech company CarbonCure Technologies has announced the completion of a major new installation at YYC Calgary International Airport.

New deicing pad made with CarbonCure Concrete, reducing 160 tonnes of carbon, equivalent to 209 acres of forest absorbing CO2 over the course of a year.

The new deicing pad, the East Deicing Apron, was built with CarbonCure Technologies' reduced-carbon concrete in August and September of 2019. The first airplanes started using the facility just weeks ago.

The amount of concrete poured to build the East Deicing Apron was the second largest pour of CarbonCure concrete in a single project, and the largest quantity to be used at an airport in Canada.

"2019 was a record year for CarbonCure, as our producer partners' total production volume and the associated carbon savings nearly doubled from that of 2018," said Robert Niven, the company's founder and CEO. "We are proud that a project based in Canada was such a large contributor to these milestones. This is yet another instance of CarbonCure concrete easily meeting rigorous performance standards, including the top-tier design and engineering standards required for airport paving."

CarbonCure injects waste carbon dioxide (CO2) captured by industrial gas suppliers into concrete during mixing, enabling the production of stronger, more sustainable concrete. Every cubic metre of concrete made with this technology reduces an average of 16 kilograms of carbon emissions, meaning an average high-rise built with CarbonCure concrete would save approximately 120 tonnes of CO2 emissions.

More than 25,000 cubic metres of CarbonCure concrete was poured for the construction of the East Deicing Apron project, realizing 160 tonnes of carbon savings. That's equivalent to 209 acres of forest absorbing CO2 over the course of a year.

"YYC Calgary International Airport is pleased to be a leader as the largest airport user to-date of CarbonCure in Canada. As YYC strives to be a leader in airport sustainability, we fully supported our airline partners in the decision to inject captured carbon into the new East Deicing Apron's concrete pavement," said Carmelle Hunka, general counsel, vice president, risk and compliance of the Calgary Airport Authority.

In 2019 alone, CarbonCure partners' total concrete production volume surpassed 3.3 million cubic metres, with an average monthly output of 145,000 cubic metres. Total CO2 emissions reductions for the year surpassed 55,000 tonnes, which is equivalent to the carbon absorbed by more than 70,000 acres of forest or taking 12,000 cars off the road for a year.

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