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Aviation Sustainability and the Environment, CAPA 26-Feb-2020

Analysis

Japan Airlines studying feasibility of production and sales of sustainable aviation fuel

Southampton Airport completes first phase of fixed electrical ground power programme

London Stansted Airport: We need to encourage reduction in emissions from road traffic

Sydney Kingsford Smith Airport outlines 2020 TCFD roadmap

Sydney Kingsford Smith Airport 'on the pathway' to carbon neutrality

This CAPA report features a summary of recent aviation sustainability and environment news, selected from the 300+ news alerts published daily by CAPA. For more information, please contact us.

Japan Airlines studying feasibility of production and sales of sustainable aviation fuel

Japan Airlines, Marubeni Corporation, JXTG Nippon Oil & Energy Corporation and JGC Japan Corporation agreed (25-Feb-2020) to jointly conduct a feasibility study on sustainable aviation fuel (SAF) production and sales in Japan through the use of industrial and municipal waste, including plastic waste.

The companies will evaluate the feasibility of the entire supply chain with respect to creating SAF from industrial and municipal waste by applying the process and technology of Fulcrum BioEnergy. The study will take place from Feb-2020 to Dec-2020, after which, based on the results of the study, the companies will aim to install demonstration equipment and conduct tests in the early 2020s, and start construction of commercial equipment around 2025. [more - original PR - English/Japanese]

Original report:

Feasibility Study on Production and Sales of Sustainable Aviation Fuel Made from Plastic and Other Waste Materials

Japan Airlines Co., Ltd., Marubeni Corporation, JXTG Nippon Oil & Energy Corporation, and JGC JAPAN CORPORATION have agreed to jointly conduct a feasibility study on Sustainable Aviation Fuel (SAF) production and sales in Japan through the use of industrial and municipal waste, including plastic waste.

As the demand for air transport steadily increases, the aviation industry recognizes the importance of working to counter the effects of climate change. Additionally, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) has implemented carbon-reduction initiatives from 2021.1 Currently, SAF is considered to be a realistic and effective means of reducing CO2 emissions, and there is growing momentum for its adaptation. Furthermore, the disposal and/or processing of plastic waste is a recognized social issue, one to which the world awaits an innovative solution that will lead to a more sustainable society.

In this joint study, the parties plan to evaluate the feasibility of the entire supply chain with respect to creating SAF from industrial and municipal waste, including middle and low grade plastic waste (these types are currently either incinerated, or become landfill), by applying the process and technology of Fulcrum BioEnergy, Inc.2, a United States company that produces biojet fuel. JAL, Marubeni, JXTG and JGC have executed an MOU with Taisei Corporation and TAKEEI CORPORATION in February 2020, and each participating company will contribute its respective expertise to study the collection and processing systems of waste, the technological aspects of SAF production, logistics of end-products, and the effect of carbon emissions by LCA.3 The study will take place from February to December 2020. After that, based on the results of this joint study, all parties will aim to install demonstration equipment and conduct tests in the early 2020s, and start construction of commercial equipment around 2025.

By promoting the development and spread of SAF, all parties will together contribute to the establishment of concrete solutions to societal concerns such as decreasing CO2 emissions from aviation fuel and plastic waste treatment, thus contributing to a more sustainable future.

Notes 
1 In 2016, the ICAO adopted CORSIA (Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation). Under CORSIA, airlines are obligated to procure CO2 emission credit and offset carbon emissions, if the limits are exceeded, so that in entirety the CO2 emissions amount does not increase from 2021. ICAO-certified SAF is allowed to be deducted from the offset obligation.

2 In September 2018, JAL and Marubeni, jointly with Japan Overseas Infrastructure Investment Corporation for Transport & Urban Development, invested into Fulcrum BioEnergy, Inc. 
September 21, 2018 - Japan Airlines Invests in Development of Sustainable Aviation Fuel Technology 
https://press.jal.co.jp/en/release/201809/004885.html

3 Life Cycle Assessment : A method to assess environmental impact through the life cycle of a product or service.

日本における代替航空燃料の製造・販売事業に関する事業性調査の実施について

日本航空株式会社(所在地:東京都品川区、代表取締役社長:赤坂祐二、以下「JAL」)、丸紅株式会社(所在地:東京都中央区、代表取締役社長:柿木真澄、以下「丸紅」)、JXTGエネルギー株式会社(所在地:東京都千代田区、代表取締役社長:大田勝幸、以下「JXTG」)、日揮株式会社(所在地:神奈川県横浜市、代表取締役社長執行役員:山田昇司、以下「日揮」)は、廃棄プラスチックを含む産業廃棄物・一般廃棄物等から代替航空燃料(Sustainable Aviation Fuel)を日本で製造・販売することについての事業性調査(以下、「本調査」)を共同で実施します。

航空業界においては、グローバルな航空輸送需要の拡大に伴い、地球温暖化による気候変動への対応が喫緊の課題となっており、国際民間航空機関(ICAO)は、2021年以降のCO2排出削減制度(*1)を導入しました。代替航空燃料の使用は、CO2の排出量を削減する現実的かつ有効な手段と期待され、導入機運が高まっています。また、廃棄プラスチックの処理は社会的課題として認識されており、持続可能な社会を実現するためには、より革新的な手法での処理が期待されています。

本調査では、米国の代替航空燃料製造企業Fulcrum BioEnergy社(*2)の技術を活用し、現在、リサイクルできず、国内で焼却・埋立処理されている中・低品位の廃棄プラスチックを含む産業廃棄物や一般廃棄物を原料とする「国産」代替航空燃料の製造・販売に関わるサプライチェーン構築に向けた事業性評価を実施します。JAL、丸紅、JXTG、日揮は、大成建設株式会社および株式会社タケエイと本調査を共同で実施する覚書を2020年2月に締結しました。参画企業はそれぞれの専門性を生かし、2020年2月から12月にかけて、廃棄物の収集・処理システムの検討や製造プロセスの技術評価、製品のロジスティックスの評価、LCA(*3)によるCO2排出量削減効果の検証等を行います。その後、本調査の結果を踏まえ、2020年代前半に実証設備の導入および試験の実施、2025年頃に商用機の着工を目指します。

本調査ならびにその後の事業化への取り組みを通じ、参画企業各社は、持続可能な社会の実現のために、代替航空燃料の開発・普及を推進し、航空燃料のCO2排出量削減および廃棄プラスチック問題という社会課題に対するソリューションの確立に貢献していきます。

(*1)  2016年にICAOがCORSIA制度(国際民間航空のためのカーボンオフセットおよび削減スキーム)を採択。 
2021年以降にCO2排出量を増加させない制度で、各航空会社は決められた排出枠を超えてCO2を排出した場合、必要量の排出枠を購入しオフセットする義務等が課されている。なお、ICAO認定の代替航空燃料はオフセット義務分から控除することが認められている。 
(*2)  2018年9月にJALと丸紅が、株式会社海外交通・都市開発事業支援機構と共同で出資。 
<参照> JAL プレスリリース 
(*3)  Life Cycle Assessment:製品やサービスのライフサイクルを通じた環境への影響を評価する手法。

Southampton Airport completes first phase of fixed electrical ground power programme

Southampton Airport launched (24-Feb-2020) phase one of a fixed electrical ground power programme (FEGP), as part of its carbon neutrality target. FEGP will provide a direct electrical feed to aircraft from the airport's main power circuit, made from 100% renewable sources.

It will initially be set up at four stands, enabling carriers to switch off their respective auxiliary power units whilst being cleaned and restocked. Southampton is aiming to complete the site by 2030.

Southampton Airport MD Neil Garwood stated the move "also complements the many electric handling vehicles already operating on the apron as part of our over-arching Sustainability Strategy". [more - original PR]

Original report: Southampton Airport Powers Up for Carbon Reduction

Southampton Airport has taken a leap forward in reducing its carbon emissions, as it switches on its green electricity feeds for stationary aircraft at stands.

After having launched phase one of its Fixed Electrical Ground Power programme, Southampton Airport is getting closer to meeting its carbon neutrality target.

Launched by Eastleigh Borough Council’s Councillor Rupert Kyrle and Southampton Airport’s Managing Director, Neil Garwood, the newly completed Fixed Electrical Ground Power (FEGP) will provide a direct electrical feed to aircraft from the airport’s main power circuit, which is from 100% renewable sources.

Before FEGP was rolled out, stationary aircraft that were being offloaded or awaiting passengers were charged by built-in Auxiliary Power Units (APUs) which use jet fuel, or Ground Power Units (GPUs) which are mobile engines powered by diesel.

With FEGP, which has been initially set up at four stands, airlines can now switch off their respective Auxiliary Power Units whilst being cleaned and restocked – eliminating costs, carbon emissions and noise caused by both APUs and GPUs.

Speaking on the launch of FEGP at the airport, Neil Garwood, Managing Director at Southampton Airport, said; “This is the first phase of our Fixed Electrical Ground Power programme, which is one of many ways that will contribute to Southampton Airport becoming carbon-neutral by 2030, we also aim to have Fixed Electrical Ground Power at all 12 stands that same year.

“It will now be obligatory for all airline operators to switch off their engines whilst undergoing the turnaround process meaning a quieter emission free air side for passengers, staff as well as our neighbours.

“This move also complements the many electric handling vehicles already operating on the apron as part of our over-arching Sustainability Strategy.”

Councillor Rupert Kyrle, Cabinet Member for the Environment at Eastleigh Borough Council, added: “Ensuring actions are taken to tackle the climate crisis is essential and it’s great to see that this issue is being addressed by both Southampton Airport and the aviation industry.

“Personally, I welcome the roll out of phase 1 of the Fixed Electrical Ground Power programme and look forward to seeing what the airport will do next to guarantee targets are met in the years to come.”

As well as aiming to be carbon neutral by 2030, Southampton Airport recently joined Sustainable Aviation, a coalition of aviation industry experts comprising airports, airlines and manufacturers amongst many others, set on achieving net zero carbon emissions for the UK’s aviation sector by 2050.

FEGP Fast Facts;

  • This is phase one of FEGP with a commitment to complete the site by 2030. Stands 2-5 have been set up with FEGP.
  • We mandate that airlines use FEGP as the only source of ground power can expect to save nearly 600 tonnes CO² each year.

This is equivalent to;

  • 1,500,000 miles covered by a car
  • 260,600 litres of petrol and 221,950 litres of diesel*
  • 100 homes’ electricity supply for the whole year
  • Could charge up to 76,000,000 smartphones
  • 200 tonnes of waste

London Stansted Airport: We need to encourage reduction in emissions from road traffic

London Stansted Airport landside operations director Anita Harrison stated: "We need to build on our good track record of encouraging a reduction in emissions from road traffic" (Passenger Terminal Today, 25-Feb-2020). Ms Harrison added: "Our investment in our public transport network will make it even easier to leave the car at home, while also encouraging the take up of electric vehicles".

Sydney Kingsford Smith Airport outlines 2020 TCFD roadmap

Sydney Kingsford Smith Airport outlined (21-Feb-2020) the following 2020 targets for the airports Taskforce on Climate Related Disclosures (TCFD) roadmap:

  • Further integrate scenario analysis into strategic planning and risk management framework;
  • Consider more detailed scenarios, including transitional risks and risks to the industry more broadly;
  • Develop third party mitigation strategies and collaborate more broadly;
  • Report on metrics for assessing climate related risks and opportunities. [more - original PR]

Excerpt from original report: Sustainability Report 2019

Planning for the future

We completed the 2019 activities in our TCFD Roadmap this year, which included expanding our scenario analysis, updating our climate risk and adaptation plan, strengthening internal engagement on climate risk and reviewing our climate related targets.

2018

  • Public support for TCFD Recommendations
  • Conduct gap analysis against disclosure areas
  • Identify internal team to assess and manage climate-related risks and opportunities

2019

  • Expand scenario analysis
  • Review and update climate change risk and adaptation plan
  • Internal engagement and training on climate risk
  • Review targets

2020

  • Further integrate scenario analysis into strategic planning and risk management framework
  • Consider more detailed scenarios including transitional risks to the industry more broadly
  • Develop third party mitigation strategies and collaborate more broadly
  • Report on metrics for assessing climate-related risks and opportunities  

Sydney Kingsford Smith Airport 'on the pathway' to carbon neutrality

Sydney Kingsford Smith Airport reported (21-Feb-2020) the airport is "on the pathway" to be carbon neutral by 2025, in line with ACI's Airport Carbon Accreditation Scheme. Sydney Airport reported its pathway considers decarbonisation options ranging from energy efficiency, strategic sourcing of renewables, engagement and carbon offsets. [more - original PR]

Excerpt from original report: Sustainability Report 2019

Pathway to carbon neutral

At Sydney Airport, we are on a pathway to be carbon neutral by 2025, in line with ACI’s Airport Carbon Accreditation Scheme. Our pathway considers various decarbonisation options ranging from energy efficiency, strategic sourcing of renewables, engagement and carbon offsets. A priority-based hierarchy is applied to ensure the transition provides flexibility in growth, a balanced risk portfolio and commercial competitiveness while striving to achieve carbon neutrality.

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