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Aviation Sustainability and the Environment, CAPA 07-Apr-2022

Analysis

This regular CAPA report provides a summary of recent aviation sustainability and environment news. This latest issue features:

Hawaiian Airlines launches emissions offsetting partnership with Conservation International

Finnair commits to Science Based Targets initiative

Bordeaux Airport announces environmental projects for 2022

EASA to allow airlines to reduce extra fuel load

Thales announces world's first ATC station powered entirely by solar panels

Summary
  • Hawaiian Airlines partners with Conservation International to offer carbon offsetting for travelers.
  • Finnair commits to Science Based Targets initiative to reduce carbon emissions.
  • Bordeaux Airport announces environmental projects for 2022, including solar panels and energy consumption reduction.
  • EASA allows airlines to reduce extra fuel load, reducing CO2 emissions.
  • Thales introduces the world's first fully sustainable, solar-powered air traffic control radar station in Chile.
  • These initiatives contribute to the aviation industry's efforts towards sustainability and reducing environmental impact.

This CAPA report features a summary of recent aviation sustainability and environment news, selected from the 300+ news alerts published daily by CAPA. For more information, please contact us.

Hawaiian Airlines launches emissions offsetting partnership with Conservation International

Hawaiian Airlines and Conservation International launched (06-Apr-2022) a partnership enabling travelers to measure and offset their travel carbon emissions by supporting sustainability projects.

Hawaiian Airlines travelers can input their origin and destination on a carbon calculator to determine the emissions of their itinerary.

Travelers may then choose to offset these emissions by donating to Conservation International's forest carbon projects that reduce deforestation.

The carrier has also pledged to match all guest offsets throughout Apr-2022 and to offset all future employee business travel on Hawaiian flights. [ more - original PR ]

Original report: Hawaiian Airlines Guests Can Now Balance Out Carbon Impact; Carrier Pledges to Match All Offsets in April

Hawaiian Airlines is giving guests on any of the carrier's flights the option to measure and offset the carbon emissions of their travel by supporting projects that help keep forests standing.

Hawai'i's hometown airline is marking the launch of its new program in partnership with Conservation International by matching all guest offsets during April - in recognition of Earth Day later this month - and committing to offsetting all future employee business travel on Hawaiian's flights.

"Following our pledge last year to achieve net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, we wanted to also give our guests - both visitors to Hawai'i as well as our island residents - the opportunity to reduce the impact of their individual emissions when traveling with us," said Alanna James, managing director of sustainability initiatives at Hawaiian Airlines. "Conservation International offers a simple and meaningful way for our guests to support climate action, and we are delighted to welcome them onboard as partners in minimizing our environmental impact."

Effective today, Hawaiian's guests booking travel within the Hawaiian Islands and between Hawai'i and the continental United States, as well as Japan, South Korea, Australia, Auckland, Tahiti or American Samoa, can enter their origin and destination on a carbon calculator - adding multiple legacies and travelers, if necessary - and determining the emissions of their itinerary. Travelers can then choose to balance out their impact by contributing to forest carbon projects that reduce deforestation, the second leading cause of climate change.

Resulting donations will directly fund projects led by Conservation International that generate high-quality, independently verified carbon credits that protect forests and support local communities. These carbon credit investments advance the work of dozens of projects like the Chyulu Hills REDD+ project in southeast Kenya, validated by the strict requirements of Verified Carbon Standard (VCS) and Climate Community and Biodiversity Standards (CCB).

More information about Hawaiian's carbon offset program is available here.

Hawaiian has committed to achieving net-zero carbon emissions by 2050 through ongoing fleet investments, more efficient flying, carbon offsets and industry advocacy for air traffic control reform and sustainable aviation fuel development and proliferation. To learn more about Hawaiian's sustainability work, please read the 2021 Corporate Kuleana report.

Finnair commits to Science Based Targets initiative

Finnair signed (01-Apr-2022) a letter of intent marking its commitment to the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) to reduce carbon emissions in line with the UN Paris Climate Agreement.

The carrier's target is set within two years. Finnair's existing climate strategy targets halved net emissions on 2019 levels by 2025 and full carbon neutrality by 2045. [ more - original PR ]

Original report: Finnair commits to Science-Based Targets initiative (SBTi)

Finnair has signed a letter of intent for a commitment to cooperate with the Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) to bring CO2 emissions reduction targets in line with the UN Paris Climate Agreement. Finnair sets the target within the next two years. The UN Paris Climate Agreement aims to limit global warming to well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels to combat the effects of climate change.

"The climate challenges of flying need to be solved, so that the social and economic benefits of aviation can continue. Finnair has ambitious emissions reduction targets: by the end of 2025, we intend to halve the level of net emissions from 2019 and achieve carbon neutrality latest by the end of 2045. Commitment to the CO2 reduction path SBTi has developed for aviation aligns our targets with the Paris Climate Agreement," says Eveliina Huurre, SVP Sustainability at Finnair.

Finnair uses an extensive toolkit to achieve emission reductions. The key tools reducing emissions include reducing the weight of aircraft, developing fuel-efficient flight methods, using sustainable fuels (SAF) and offsets, and engaging customers in reducing aviation emissions. Finnair is also actively exploring the possibilities of introducing new technologies into its operations.

The Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) is a global body enabling businesses to set ambitious emissions reductions targets in line with the latest climate science. It is focused on accelerating companies and financial institutions across the world to halve emissions before 2030 and achieve net-zero emissions before 2050. The initiative is a collaboration between CDP, the United Nations Global Compact, World Resources Institute (WRI) and the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) and one of the We Mean Business Coalition commitments.

Bordeaux Airport announces environmental projects for 2022

Bordeaux Airport announced (31-Mar-2022) plans to enhance the airport's ecological transition by initiating various environmental projects in 2022, including:

  • Installation of 3000sqm of photovoltaic panels in P0 car park, reducing emissions by 4%;
  • Launch of energy consumption metering plan, with the goal of reducing consumption in monitored buildings by between 5% and 10%;
  • Study of geothermal pumping systems to replace natural gas use;
  • Electrification of vehicle fleet, including delivery of first electric passenger transport bus.

The airport is aiming to achieve carbon neutrality by 2030. [more - original PR - French]

Original report: L'Aéroport de Bordeaux se tourne vers l'avenir

2022 est une année de transition pour l'Aéroport de Bordeaux, l'occasion de réinventer le modèle aéroportuaire et d'inscrire une nouvelle vision éco-responsable sur sa feuille de route à long terme en accord avec les objectifs du territoire, de la métropole bordelaise et de la région néo-aquitaine. Le schéma de composition générale doit porter cette vision de l'aéroport de demain.


L'Aéroport de Bordeaux se tourne vers l'avenir
2022, poursuite de la transformation

Pour relever les défis, l'aéroport respectueux de l'environnement s'invente dès aujourd'hui. Depuis deux ans, la Société aéroportuaire a investi plus de 8 millions d'euros pour accélérer la transition écologique de sa plateforme, notamment diminuer les émissions de CO2. L'objectif est de proposer une réduction massive de l'empreinte carbone des infrastructures de l'aéroport et de compenser le reliquat afin d'obtenir la neutralité carbone en 2030.
Avec 80% de ses émissions de CO2 provenant du chauffage et de l'électricité, l'aéroport poursuit l'adaptation nécessaire en soutenant sa transition énergétique en 2022 :

  • Installation de 3.000m2 de panneaux photovoltaïques sur le parking P0 permettant de réduire de 4% les émissions de CO2 et étude d'implantation sur le parking P4 visant à rendre les bâtiments autonomes en énergie
  • Lancement d'un plan de comptage des consommations énergétiques permettant une diminution entre 5 et 10 % de la consommation énergétique des bâtiments maîtrisés par cet outil. 1ère phase du projet appliquée sur le Hall A en 2022.
  • Remplacement de l'intégralité des 1.750m2 de façades vitrées du Hall B, côté piste et côté ville, visant, entre autres, un gain de performance thermique. 3M€ sont investis
  • Étude de pompage géothermique en cours afin de remplacer l'utilisation du gaz naturel : 50% de diminution des consommations de gaz
  • Remplacement de la flotte des véhicules en électrique ou hybride. L'aéroport va prendre livraison de son premier bus de transport de passagers 100% électrique, un investissement de 450 k€.

" Le transport aérien est face à un défi environnemental qui l'oblige à se réinventer. L'adaptation nécessaire de notre modèle nécessite des moyens humains, techniques et financiers importants que nous mettons en œuvre. Notre nouveau département dédié à l'innovation et nos réflexions sur l'aménagement de la plateforme aéroportuaire accompagnent ces enjeux ", déclare Simon Dreschel, Président du directoire de la SA Aéroport de Bordeaux-Mérignac.

Schéma de composition générale, une stratégie construite avec le territoire

L'Aéroport de Bordeaux travaille l'avenir de la plateforme aéroportuaire. A la demande du Ministre en charge de l'Aviation civile, la société aéroportuaire prépare le schéma de composition générale qu'elle sera amenée à soumettre selon cinq axes d'orientations stratégiques : l'optimisation de l'infrastructure existante, les capacités de développement à moyen et long termes, l'amélioration de la desserte terrestre, la valorisation du foncier et le développement durable.

Vision prospective, le schéma de composition sera révisé tous les 5 ans. Ce plan permet de projeter des hypothèses de dimensionnement de l'aéroport, en accord avec les objectifs du territoire, de la métropole bordelaise et de la région néo-aquitaine. L'exercice est d'imaginer les infrastructures de demain adaptées à l'évolution du trafic et au service du territoire.

L'intégration d'une station hydrogène, les aires de décollage d'aéronefs électriques à décollage vertical ou encore la production d'énergie photovoltaïque ont été envisagées. En matière d'énergie, l'aéroport a d'ailleurs lancé en mars un appel à manifestation d'intérêt auprès des producteurs de carburant et des industriels afin de fournir des biocarburants à la plateforme aéroportuaire. Dans les différentes hypothèses d'aménagement de la plate-forme, l'Aéroport de Bordeaux, accompagné de cabinets d'experts, a réalisé des analyses multicritères. Cette approche a également été appliquée sur les scénarios de maintien ou de fermeture de la piste secondaire.

L'apparition d'évènements de sécurité significatifs liés aux pistes sécantes, comme les incursions de pistes (1), ont fait l'objet d'analyses approfondies. Au-delà de l'amélioration continue de la sécurité, les enjeux de maintenance ou encore les coûts de mise aux normes européennes de la piste secondaire ont été analysés.

Les volets environnementaux visant à éviter l'imperméabilisation des sols et ses incidences sur le cycle de l'eau ont été des préoccupations majeures en matière d'aménagements. Viser la réutilisation des surfaces déjà imperméabilisées peut permettre d'éviter 17 200 m² d'imperméabilisation.

La limitation de l'impact sonore des activités est également un axe majeur du projet de l'Aéroport de Bordeaux. Engagé dans un plan global de réduction des nuisances sonores, l'aéroport a participé à l'élaboration du plan de prévention du bruit dans l'environnement (PPBE) avec les services compétents de l'Etat, le Service de la Navigation Aérienne et la Direction de la Sécurité de l'Aviation Civile. L'aéroport s'engage ainsi à proposer une modulation tarifaire afin d'inciter les avions les moins bruyants, à travailler son infrastructure pour des meilleures performances au décollage ou encore à mieux communiquer aux riverains via son guichet internet de visualisation des trajectoires et des nuisances sonores, Aérovision.

EASA to allow airlines to reduce extra fuel load

EASA published (25-Mar-2022) a decision which proposes that air operators be allowed to reduce the amount of fuel carried during operations, thereby reducing CO2 emissions. The decision will enter force on 30-Oct-2022. Details include:

  • EASA stated the amount of additional fuel required can be optimized, while continuing to ensure high safety levels, due to improved risk assessment, calculations based on better data and better decision making;
  • The precise reductions that would be permissible for individual operations will vary according to routing and aircraft used;
  • The regulatory package is aligned with guidance from ICAO and the principles will also apply for aircraft powered fully or partially by alternative energy sources, such as electric aircraft.
  • EASA stated the regulatory package will have the following benefits:
    • Maximum fuel reduction of approximately one million tonnes p/a for EU operators, based on operations in 2015;
    • Potential estimated annual saving of three million tons of CO2 p/a, with estimated savings of 0.29kg per minute on a short haul flight and 2.31kg per minute on a long haul flight. This potential saving would represent approximately 1% of European flight emissions.

EASA flight standards director Jesper Rasmussen stated: "There is no reason to lift up more fuel reserve into the sky than necessary... this can be done without compromising safety - the reduction is possible thanks to better assessment methods and better data which allow airlines to carry out a more precise risk assessment". [ more - original PR ]

Original report: EASA publishes new fuel/energy rules with positive environmental impact

The European Union Aviation Safety Agency has published a Decision which proposes that air operators be allowed to reduce the amount of fuel carried during operations, thereby reducing the CO2 emissions of the overall flight and environmental impact of the flight.

Aircraft are required to carry enough fuel to ensure the safety of operations in case their flight plan needs to change for reasons that could include the delays on approach to the destination airport or even the impossibility to land due to weather considerations or other issues. Carriage of this extra fuel, as it adds weight to the aircraft, increases the fuel consumption and total emissions from the flight.

The amount of additional fuel required can be optimized, while continuing to ensure high safety levels, due to improved risk assessment, calculations based on better data and better decision making. The regulatory package, which consists of Regulation (EU) 2021/1296 and ED Decision 2022/005/R providing the AMC and GM, is aligned with guidance from ICAO. The principles will also apply for aircraft powered fully or partially by alternative energy sources, such as electric aircraft.

"This regulatory package is part of the overall efforts of EASA to reduce the impact of aviation on the environment," says Jesper Rasmussen, EASA Flight Standards Director. "There is no reason to lift up more fuel reserve into the sky than necessary - lifting fuel burns more fuel. Most importantly, this can be done without compromising safety - the reduction is possible thanks to better assessment methods and better data which allow airlines to carry out a more precise risk assessment."

The EASA Decision 2022/005/R will enter into force on October 30, 2022.

The new rules bring in three different fuel schemes: basic fuel scheme, fuel scheme with variations and individual fuel scheme. The transition from the current rules to the basic fuel scheme requires little additional effort from the perspective of an air operator.

The other two schemes are voluntary and will take more resources to implement as those require enhanced monitoring capabilities from the airlines. National authorities will also have to adjust their oversight to ensure that safety levels are not compromised.

The precise reductions that would be permissible for individual operations vary according to routing and aircraft used.

From an environmental perspective this regulatory package will have the following benefits:

  • According to the scenarios analyzed in the NPA 2016-06 (A), the maximum fuel reduction would be in the order of magnitude of 1 million tonnes per year for the EU MSs' operators on the basis of the flights in 2015.
  • This would translate into a potential estimated annual saving of 3 million tonnes of CO2 (based on the assumption of 1 tonne of fuel producing 3 tonnes of CO2).
  • According to NPA 2016-06 (A), this would mean a potential saving estimate of 0.29 kg per minute in a short-haul flight, and of 2.31 kg per minute on a long-haul flight.
  • This potential saving would represent approximately 1% of European flight emissions.
    Note: that the savings will benefit the long-haul flights to a greater extent. These are the flights that produce most of the CO2 emissions. According to Eurocontrol data, long-haul flights represent 6.2% of the flights but create 51.9% of the CO2 emissions.

EASA will provide support for air operators through the Safety Promotion material in Safety Promotion Task (SPT.0097) outlined in EPAS Volume II (Page 71). Latest updates on this material will be posted in the EASA Air Ops Community.

Thales announces world's first ATC station powered entirely by solar panels

Thales announced (06-Apr-2022) plans to introduce an air traffic control (ATC) radar station in Calama, Chile powered by 330 solar panels.

Thales stated the facility will be the world's first ATC station to be entirely powered by sustainable solar energy.

The station was developed for Chile's Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil and consists of a primary Star NG and secondary RSM radar. [more - original PR]

Original report: Thales to deploy the world's first fully sustainable, solar-powered Air Traffic Control radar station in Calama, Chile

  • The first ATC radar station in the world to be powered 100% by sustainable solar energy.
  • A revolutionary innovation using green technology and 330 solar panels, taking advantage of the high rate of solar incidence in Chile.
  • Comprised of a primary Star NG and secondary RSM radar, the radar station will improve the air traffic surveillance in the Northern Chile and increase Calama's airport safety with the broadcast coverage in the market.

Thales, a global technology leader, is advancing air traffic surveillance and safety in Chile with a revolutionary new radar station 100% powered by sustainable solar energy. Located in Calama, in the Atacama Desert, the first of its kind radar system leverages 330 solar panels to take full advantage of the high levels of sunshine in the region.

Developed by Thales for the Dirección General de Aeronáutica Civil (DGAC), the civil aviation authority of Chile, the solar-powered radar station is comprised of an advanced and efficient Star NG primary radar, as well as an RSM secondary radar. Combined, the radars provide all the operational surveillance requirements of both civil and military air traffic control and detects both slow and fast-moving targets such as helicopters, commercial planes, and jets. The system also delivers windfarm mitigation filters.

The innovation in terms of alternate and greener power generation is a solution that comprises not only a set of solar panels, but an efficient and comprehensive power management system that could be employed on different sites. Advanced battery technology, as well as back-up generators are deployed to secure the overall radar station operations and safeguard it against power outages or limited availability of regular sources.

"Thales strives to deliver the best-in-class solutions for ATC radars with the latest technological innovations, for the highest detection capabilities and altimetry, as well as working on sustainable projects. Today's climate and energy constraints means new ways of doing things and we are proud to contribute to the world's first ATC radar contributing to a greener and more sustainable air travel future for the DGAC in Chile, as well as improving the safety of Chilean skies" Lionel De Castellane, Head of Civil Radars Thales Worldwide

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