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London Stansted Airport

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London Stansted Airport

IATA Code
STN
ICAO Code
EGSS
Corporate Address
Enterprise House
Bassingbourn Rd
Stansted
Essex
CM24 1QW
United Kingdom
Website
http://www.stanstedairport.com/
City
London
Country
United Kingdom
Network
Domestic | International
Other airports serving London
London City Airport
London Gatwick Airport
London Heathrow Airport
London Luton Airport
Runways
3048m x 46m
Airlines currently operating to this airport with scheduled services
Air Moldova
Asiana Airlines
Aurigny Air Services
Cargolux Airlines International
Cyprus Airways
easyJet
Etihad Regional
Flybe
Germanwings
Martinair
Pegasus Airlines
Qatar Airways
Ryanair
Silk Way West Airlines
Thomas Cook Airlines
Thomson Airways
Airlines currently operating to this airport via codeshare
airberlin
Etihad Airways
Lufthansa

Owned and operated by Manchester Airports Group, it having been sold by Heathrow Airport Holdings Ltd (BAA) on 28-Feb-2013, London Stansted Airport is the third largest airport serving Greater London and is located in the District of Uttlesford in Essex. Hosting regional and international passenger and cargo services for over 20 airlines, London Stansted is a major hub for low-cost and charter airlines including Easyjet, Ryanair, Thomas Cook Airlines and Thomson Airways.

Location of London Stansted Airport, United Kingdom

Ground Handlers and Cargo Handlers servicing London Stansted Airport

Fuel & Oil Suppliers servicing London Stansted Airport


 
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1,084 total articles

and

65 total articles

and

Ryanair raises FY2015 profit guidance after strong 1Q. Warm and fuzzy O'Leary may be working

29-Jul-2014 12:31 PM

Ryanair increased its profits substantially in 1QFY2015, as revenue per seat grew faster than cost per seat. By comparison with the same quarter a year earlier, revenues and profits were assisted by the inclusion of Easter in 1Q this year, but the underlying trends still looked favourable.

In spite of its caution over the outlook for average fares in 2H, Ryanair has raised its profit guidance for FY2015, based on higher traffic and load factors and lower cost per passenger than previously expected.

This is in contrast with its profit warning last autumn (and with more recent profit warnings from a number of European legacy carriers) and gives some comfort that its strategic shift to increase the emphasis on customer service may be starting to work.

easyJet lassos London Gatwick and Luton airports with long term deals

2-Apr-2014 6:09 PM

easyJet has recently concluded long term deals with Gatwick and Luton airports, its two largest London bases. The Gatwick deal follows a change in economic regulation that encourages a more tailored approach and the Luton agreement follows a change of concession ownership and a commitment to capacity expansion.

Last year, easyJet reached a similar agreement with Stansted, which is no longer subject to economic regulation. easyJet also operates from Southend, the smallest London airport, albeit not under a long term contract.

easyJet's London airport deals give it both a high level of visibility over airport charges and real flexibility about where to deploy its capacity. It has thrown an effective lasso around the UK's capital, and now appears to have tightened its grip on the rope.

CAA’s final decisions on London airport prices shift the balance back towards the airlines… for now

17-Jan-2014 11:31 PM

The regular quinquennial review of airport charges at London’s three biggest airports has finally come to its conclusion. As always, this has been an exercise in attempting to reconcile the irreconcilable. Nevertheless, with the publication of its final decisions on 10-Jan-2014 (not to be confused with its ‘final proposals’, published in Oct-2013), the UK’s Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) has ruled a line between the wishes of the airlines and airports.

After very substantial price increases in the previous regulatory period, the clamour from airlines for the CAA to place more aggressive caps on airport charges for the period 2014 to 2019 appears to have been heard. At Heathrow and Gatwick, the CAA’s price caps are below inflation. Not low enough, say the airlines, but their comments do not have the same vehemence as in the past, while these two airports sound genuinely dismayed by the decisions and by the changes since Oct-2013.

At Stansted, price regulation is to be abandoned altogether as the CAA now judges that the airport no longer has substantial market power after long term agreements, incorporating price discounts, were struck directly with the main airlines there.

UK Airports Commission: the UK's runway capacity farce continues as opponents dig in

15-Oct-2013 3:47 PM

The UK’s Airports Commission, tasked with looking into the need for additional UK airport capacity, has reached an important provisional conclusion. On 7-Oct-2013, the Commission’s Chairman Sir Howard Davies said: “We will need some net additional runway capacity in the south east of England in the coming decades”. Relying only on existing runways would “produce a distinctly sub-optimal solution for passengers, connectivity and the economy”.

Meanwhile, campaign group Stop Stansted Expansion is seeking to launch a legal challenge to the Commission’s work. This is on the grounds that one of the Commission’s former members, ex-CEO of Manchester Airports Group Geoff Muirhead, who stepped down in Sep-2013, may have been able to influence it in MAG’s favour.

This illustrates one of the difficulties in making decisions about future airport capacity. Whatever its final recommendations in 2015, it will be impossible to reconcile the different views of national politicians, local politicians, airlines, airports, environmental campaigners and NIMBY-ism (‘not in my back yard’). Nevertheless, the UK’s future as a global aviation hub demands that a clear decision be taken.

CAA’s ‘final’ proposals for London airport prices may be trying to reconcile the irreconcilable

11-Oct-2013 3:36 PM

The UK CAA’s mind-numbingly long and complex review of airport charges at Heathrow, Gatwick and Stansted is almost complete. In the five-yearly process, the regulator consults with airports and airlines. It publishes proposals and amends proposals, trying to reconcile the irreconcilable.

Between 2007 and 2012, aeronautical income per passenger at Heathrow almost doubled; at Gatwick it rose by more than two thirds; and at Stansted it grew by 43%. They all beat the 14% increase in the UK’s Retail Price Index over this period. Airlines now want prices to fall, while airports seek further increases to pay for planned capital expenditure and to reward investors.

The usual result of the review is that neither side is pleased. After the publication on 3-Oct-2013 of the CAA’s ‘final’ proposals for price caps from 2014 to 2019, the usual result looks likely again at Heathrow. At Gatwick, the CAA might just find common ground between the two sides. At Stansted, it seems the regulator has been by-passed entirely. Final decisions are due in Jan-2014.

Ryanair’s new customer-friendly approach. Really?

3-Oct-2013 3:49 PM

This week Ryanair celebrated 16 years of being listed on the Irish Stock Exchange. Its market capitalisation of around EUR9 billion makes it Ireland’s second largest public company and it has been Europe’s most profitable airline for many years. It is also the largest airline in Europe, ranked by seats, and recently signed a new 10 year growth deal with its largest airport, London Stansted (analysed by CAPA on 27-Sep-2013). But it does not seem content to sit back and congratulate itself.

Following a profit warning in early Sep-2013, CEO Michael O’Leary admitted that the airline recently dubbed as “the international code word for consumer trauma” (David McWilliams, Financial Times, 28-Sep-2013) needs to soften its image. It has announced plans to develop its distribution policy and to position itself as more customer friendly.

Is this a sudden and significant change in Ryanair’s approach, prompted by fears over falling profits as suggested by much of the recent media coverage? Or is it a further evolution of a business that has always adapted?

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