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Director Aviation Development and Policy

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London Gatwick Airport

Formerly owned by BAA, London Gatwick Airport is operated by Gatwick Airport Ltd. Gatwick is wholly-owned by Ivy Bidco Limited (Ivy), a company formed to undertake the acquisition of Gatwick. Ivy is ultimately controlled by funds managed by Global Infrastructure Management, LLC, part of Global Infrastructure Partners (GIP). GIP, a USD5.6 billion independent investment fund, invests worldwide in infrastructure assets. It targets investments in air transport infrastructure, ports, freight rail, power and utilities, natural resources infrastructure, water distribution and treatment, and waste management.

London Gatwick is the second busiest airport in the United Kingdom. Hosting regional and international passenger and cargo services for over 30 airlines, London Gatwick is a hub for airlines including Aer Lingus, British Airways, easyJet, Flybe, Monarch Airlines, Thomas Cook Airlines, Thomson Airways and Virgin Atlantic Airways. London Gatwick is the busiest single-runway airport in the world.

Location of London Gatwick Airport, United Kingdom

Ground Handlers servicing London Gatwick Airport


 
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1,813 total articles

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116 total articles

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easyJet lassos London Gatwick and Luton airports with long term deals

2-Apr-2014 6:09 PM

easyJet has recently concluded long term deals with Gatwick and Luton airports, its two largest London bases. The Gatwick deal follows a change in economic regulation that encourages a more tailored approach and the Luton agreement follows a change of concession ownership and a commitment to capacity expansion.

Last year, easyJet reached a similar agreement with Stansted, which is no longer subject to economic regulation. easyJet also operates from Southend, the smallest London airport, albeit not under a long term contract.

easyJet's London airport deals give it both a high level of visibility over airport charges and real flexibility about where to deploy its capacity. It has thrown an effective lasso around the UK's capital, and now appears to have tightened its grip on the rope.

Saudi Arabia's flynas long-haul LCC to Europe and Asia, introducing a new low cost alternative

16-Mar-2014 9:00 AM

In the Middle East, Emirates, Etihad and Qatar capture most attention, but the market is home to increasing numbers and varieties of airlines. Saudi Arabia's LCC flynas, recently re-branded from Nas Air, has embarked on its 20x20 plan that sees it aiming to fly 20 million passengers by 2020, a large increase from over 3 million in 2013. Central to boosting numbers is a long-haul low-cost operation that will by May-2014 serve an impressive – if challenging – eight destinations in five countries.

The plan has elements of other long-haul LCCs: targeting a large outbound market (as Jetstar has done in Australia) but also, in catering to religious traffic, taking a Cebu Pacific approach of a specific type of traffic, which can be voluminous but seasonal and flows in very specific directions. flynas will be a hybrid LCC from the start, embodied in its "LCC+" approach. Business class will be offered and all fares come with checked luggage. Some may find this counterintuitive to the basics of an LCC, but the approach seems adapted to cater to the nuances of the Saudi market, which has the appetite and wallet for travelling. Despite being close to Gulf mega carrier hubs, the Saudi market is ripe for more stimulation.

CAA’s final decisions on London airport prices shift the balance back towards the airlines… for now

17-Jan-2014 11:31 PM

The regular quinquennial review of airport charges at London’s three biggest airports has finally come to its conclusion. As always, this has been an exercise in attempting to reconcile the irreconcilable. Nevertheless, with the publication of its final decisions on 10-Jan-2014 (not to be confused with its ‘final proposals’, published in Oct-2013), the UK’s Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) has ruled a line between the wishes of the airlines and airports.

After very substantial price increases in the previous regulatory period, the clamour from airlines for the CAA to place more aggressive caps on airport charges for the period 2014 to 2019 appears to have been heard. At Heathrow and Gatwick, the CAA’s price caps are below inflation. Not low enough, say the airlines, but their comments do not have the same vehemence as in the past, while these two airports sound genuinely dismayed by the decisions and by the changes since Oct-2013.

At Stansted, price regulation is to be abandoned altogether as the CAA now judges that the airport no longer has substantial market power after long term agreements, incorporating price discounts, were struck directly with the main airlines there.

The Davies Commission’s Interim Report on UK airports: the big loser remains UK competitiveness

20-Dec-2013 1:13 PM

The long awaited Interim Report into airport capacity and connectivity in the UK was published by the Airports (or Davies) Commission on 17-Dec-2013. The final report is due in 2015, at or around the time of the next (fixed) scheduled General Election – although there are rumours that it might be published a little earlier than first thought.

It is no understatement to describe the attempts to resolve the conundrum over UK airport infrastructure as a saga.

The Davies Commission alone has been debating it for two years but previous attempts to find a solution date back as far as the 1960s when the airports serving London hosted a mere handful of passengers compared to the present day.

Garuda Indonesia plans more rapid expansion for 2014 and beyond despite intensifying competition

10-Dec-2013 8:00 AM

Garuda Indonesia plans to again expand at a 20% clip in 2014 as the airline group adds another 26 aircraft. While competition is intensifying in Indonesia and regionally, Garuda is confident there is sufficient demand to continue supporting rapid expansion in 2014 and over the medium to long term.

The group has expanded capacity by about 20% in 2013, with international ASKs up by about 11% and domestic ASKs up by over 30%, driven primarily by budget subsidiary Citilink. Garuda plans to pursue a similar mix of domestic and international expansion in 2014.

On the international side, 2014 will see the carrier launch its first non-stop route to Europe, Jakarta-London. Garuda is not likely to launch other new European destinations until 2015 but capacity will expand to North Asia as Garuda is mainly using its new 777-300ER fleet on Japanese routes. Domestically, Citilink will continue to grow rapidly while Garuda will expand as it starts to deploy its new fleet of ATR 72 turboprops.

Norwegian Air Shuttle: Asia's longhaul LCC model comes to the N Atlantic (but watch falling profits)

29-Oct-2013 4:57 PM

Norwegian Air Shuttle reported a fall in 3Q2013 net profit, affected by Boeing 787 disruptions and weaker demand as a result of the good northern European summer weather. Nevertheless, Norwegian continues to build for the future and announced its first UK-US trans-Atlantic routes on 17-Oct-2013.

In Jul-2014, Norwegian will launch three long-haul routes from London Gatwick to Los Angeles, New York and Fort Lauderdale, in addition to the trans-Atlantic routes operated from its Scandinavian bases. The airline is already using 787-8s on its Bangkok service.

This will be the first modern attempt to introduce the successful Asian long-haul LCC model to the North Atlantic from the UK, a concept that Ryanair's Michael O'Leary has often floated in the past. Earlier this month Qantas subsidiary Jetstar took delivery of the first of a fleet of 787-8s that it will be using on long-haul routes in Asia. SIA subsidiary Scoot will receive 787-8/9s from late 2014 and AirAsia X will use A350-900s from 2018.

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